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"Skoro syt jūlor kastor issa?"

Translation:Why is the milk green?

1 year ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Ashley09224
Ashley09224
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I wouldn't drink it...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gaby754722
Gaby754722
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It doesn't have poison, I promise!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zekariah7
Zekariah7
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blueberry milk

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Polypsyches
Polypsyches
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So it said "blue" in the hover-clue, then it says "green" here, and then I check it again and it has the option "grue". Is that a thing now?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel472405

High Valyrian, like some other languages, has a single word for green and blue: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue%E2%80%93green_distinction_in_language

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Polypsyches
Polypsyches
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Having a single word for blue and green is one thing, but this "grue" business in English is new.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elilla.b
elilla.b
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It's a recent, self-conscious coinage, used specifically to discuss things like words for blue-green in other languages. It was, I think, borrowed from Nelson Goodman's 1955 grue and bleen thought experiment in philosophy, where it has a different meaning (which see). The linguistic meaning was used in Berlin-Kay's seminal 70s work on color words in different languages.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elilla.b
elilla.b
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Shade of the evening!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anarhi

Star Wars reference?

9 months ago