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  5. "Ich habe genug Platz."

"Ich habe genug Platz."

Translation:I have enough room.

July 22, 2017

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/genoskill

Looks like Platz is a word with many usages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BonnieWright0

Is there a mistake here? Room was not given as a word for Platz. The suggested words were space, square, or yard. I put yard and got it wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hannibal-Barkas

Platz is, in general, the free space you have to sit or move. So if they translate it as "room", they think of the free room to feel comfortable. This sentence seems good for cramped spaces like on the back seat of a car or in a theater to assure your neighbour that you still feel comfortable.

Yard or square are a different meaning of the word Platz. It translates as the free (public) space between buildings. It often has been given names like "Ernst-Reuter-Platz" or something like that.

This sentence is more about the personal space you have, so yard was correctly rated as wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alvaro_1

Thanks for your explanation. Makes sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matt831766

I've also seen platz used in something like finishing order, for example, first place= platz eins (or more literally place/position 1).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/weepingweellow

Is there any way I could use Raum in this sentence? I remember reading in the House lesson that Zimmer is room as a room in a house and Raum is room in the general sense of space. Am i missing something? Does Raum refer to an indoor/closed/different “space” from Platz?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AustinP.Gill

The way i understand it is that platz is elbow room, but after some research, 'raum' is a bit bigger, or at least often used as bigger, than the house lesson lets on. Think Nazi "Lebensraum", the place where the Aryans would reside. Or, less extreme (extremity sticks, though), "Sprachraum," a place where the same parent language is spoken, i.e. Germany, Austria, Switzerland is the German Sprachraum. Big place. Platz in this sentence, little space.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ginxen
  • 1076

Platz is square or place as such - if you say "I have enough place / space" is as correct as saying "I have enough room" - why is this marked as a mistake?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

"I have enough place" isn't an English sentence. I would have thought "I have enough space" would work, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/john204

What's wrong with 'I have enough space'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/enigmajf

Okay anyone i may need some explanations about when you use Zimmer, Raum, and Platz??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gary659191

Yes but "Ist dieser Platz frei?" is used to ask if a seat is free in a restaurant. Hmm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoikaTroika
  • Sollte ein wütender Führer einmal gesagt haben.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/17097

...said noone ever.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmettHoll

Why not "I have enough spots"? I'm pretty sure I've used that as a translation for Platz before and it was accepted. Also, out of curiosity, would Platz be used if you were talking about cemetery plots?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Minervas37

"I have enough spots" would be "Ich habe genug Plätze" in the sense of already knowing enough spots to visit so you don't need any more suggestions.

"Ich habe genug Platz" on the other hand may be the answer if you and a friend are using the same tiny table, he is occupying more of the table and asks you if you need more "room". -> "Nein, ich habe genug Platz."

"the cemetery plot" would translate to "die Grabstelle" consisting of "das Grab" (=the grave) + "die Stelle" (=the place, the position)

"an Ort und Stelle" = "on the spot"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertoMon365886

"I have plenty of room" should be considered a valid answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Minervas37

That would rather translate to "Ich habe reichlich Platz."

There is a slight difference in both languages.

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