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  5. "Are you from the UK?"

"Are you from the UK?"

Translation:イギリスしゅっしんですか?

July 22, 2017

41 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mawshica

Can anyone break the sentence down?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BusterFiddlewig

I hopeI am breaking this down corectly.

"Are you from the UK?" would be...

イギリス (the UK)

しゅっしん (from)

ですか? (are you)

And when put all together would be...

イギリスしゅっしんですか?

Hope I made it clear enough. Anyone feel free to let me know if I am incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ruemara

I got it right by blindly guessing what “from” could be.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BusterFiddlewig

Or make an easier to understand explanation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/snakeyes6

Yeah.

Shusshin is "origin" but you can use it for home countries and hometowns.

So "igirisu shusshin desuka?" Is 'is england hometown?" You would normally put a "wa" in there after england, but it's not necessary in this context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YanagiPablo

I would have taught of イギリス出身 as a compound name, something like "UK-originated"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WreighChri

are particles unneeded here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthiasDr4

Why is it, that in this case, no honourifics are used?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Crazy_plant_lady

Is あなたはイギリスしゅつしんですか also correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/juliettema692065

I also wrote the same thing down and it told me it was correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rizwaan12

aren't しゅっしん and 出身 the same thing but written differently? i don't understand


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kisa-chan-

I think イギリスじんですか?might be more apropiate way to ask where are you from, because じん (人) means a "person from that place".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OskaRRRitoS

じん(人) seems to imply nationality (Japanese, American) rather than, "from a country."

For example, I'm Polish but but live in England so I'd come from England. I would use 人 in reference to Polish and しゅしん in reference to England.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CatKream

Yeah, but is never bad to learn both forms ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lolcatdo

I'm struggling with the native IME on my Mac. How can I easily type ゆ in the smaller form? My IME only seems to offer the larger one. And is there a set of instructions anywhere for IMEs?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SandFlavoured

In the Windows IME the smaller letters are accessed either by prefacing with an x (e.g. 'xyu' for ゅ) or by typing the syllable phonetically (e.g. 'shu' for しゅ). Maybe it's similar for your Mac?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nevermemory

Anyone know how to type ん on the keyboard? I've added the Japanese keyboard but typing n doesn't show me the ん option.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nevermemory

never mind, I figure it out, apparently hitting n twice does the trick.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reza-Nazemazade

when we should use か at the end?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ObitoSigma

「か」 is used to indicate whether the statement is a question. In our examples, we are assuming the topic implied is the addressee.

イギリスしゅっしんです。: You are from the U.K.

イギリスしゅっしんですか?: Are you from the U.K?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/naomigk

か is used to indicate a question is being asked! You can add か to the end of many statements to turn them into questions, which may change the implied subject of the sentence. For example, アメリカ人です。➡️ I am American. アメリカ人ですか?➡️ Are you American? By simply adding か, the subject changes from the speaker ("I") to the other person in the conversation ("you").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IesaMajeed

When asking a question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Irigitneb

か implies a question


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/minotouzum

i put it all backwards


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZareyaMalo

I can't figure out to make the ”つ” be smaller... I am using Window 10


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NomieDelai

Maybe too late, but you have to type : xtsu Same for the other : xyu, xyo ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alyssacwright

Does anyone know why "イギリスしゅっしんですか?" correct but "イギリス人ですか?" is incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nevermemory

First one inquire if you're from UK, second one inquire if you're British. So there is infact a subtle difference. In this case, the first one is correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alyssacwright

Thank you! That difference was not explained well in the lessons.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HenriqueFajardo

What's difference from? 出身ですか (しゅっしんですか) and 住んでいますか (すんでいますか)

From pure translating, both mean that you're from a certain place.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YanagiPablo

〇出身です : to originate from X

〇人です : to be a national of X; to have X nationality; to be X-(i)an

〇に住んでいます : living (currently) in X

replace 〇 with any country name you want.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WarioWareRocks

I don't know the difference between しゅっしん and 人. I used 人 and I got it wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex848316

Can this be interpreted as "Am I from the uk?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YanagiPablo

Japanese doesn't mark the "person" in verbs, and the subject is not given; so grammatically it would be a possibility.

However, in real it would be odd, even in English; you are supposed to know from where you are, aren't you?

As a thumb rule, if subject is not specifically given, then assume it is "you" (that is, the listener) for interrogative sentences, and "me" (that is, the speaker) otherwise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/somelauw

イギリス出しんですか。is not correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/somelauw

By the way, I don't know how to produce "shin" in "sushin".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/somelauw

It doesn't accept イギリス出身ですか。What's wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/somelauw

Even 英吉利出身ですか is wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gashty1

What is the difference between the Kanji and しゅつしん? Would the Kanju also be true

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