"Il est à sec."

Translation:He is out of money.

March 7, 2013

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Josh5now

So if I wanted to say "He is dry," as in just got out of the pool and dried off, I would say <<Il est sec>>? Also, would a girl take the form 'seche' when describing her as being 'broke'?

May 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/tondzino

I am not a native speaker, but the common sense tells you it would be the same, because you are not referring to a specific person, but rather a state, it is a phrase. If you wanted to say that she is dry (the he is dry part is right btw), then you would use elle est seche.

In Slovak we use a similar expresion: "som na sucho" (literally I am on dry, exactly the meaning in French) and I heard Czech people using the same expression.

February 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaTall

good question, it would be good to get it answered

September 7, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/frogcarguy

After checking with my French wife--the feminine form would be "elle a sec" and after getting out of the pool, il/elle est sec/seche.

March 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/rubenisme

So literally you would be saying "He is dried up"? Right?

March 7, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/maparece

Yup!

March 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/erik_m

I find this really funny for some reason :)

June 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/orlleite

In portuguese we use almost the same expression. When a clothing item are very very dried, the cloth of it becomes hard. Then we have 'ele está duro' which means "he is hard".

March 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Madeline05

very funny to meet with this sentence at first time in the listen and type section. :S

October 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/wolfe.francine

Is "It is broke" incorrect?

April 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

Maybe - "La banque est a' seche" ? A common problem recently.

July 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/racheltopf

to say something is broken, you use "cassé(e)."

July 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

The bank is not "broken in pieces" (vb. casser), it has run out of money - "broke" - "c'est a' sec"

January 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/DarrelDent

Seems like this should be in the idioms section...

February 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/wayne.lin

Why not "He is bankrupt."?

January 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

Bankrupt = en faillite. According to a quick check of a couple of online dictionaries.

January 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/cdeloy

I'm not seeing a translation for this sentence.

May 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaTall

DL - what is the meaning? Or are you hoping the users will come up with something appropriate and help you out? :)

May 26, 2014
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