"Ellos pueden impedir la cooperación."

Translation:They can prevent the cooperation.

5 years ago

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MarkMeyerMALP

"They can prevent cooperation" is now marked correct.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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Isn't "impede" more "correct" than "prevent" in this sentence? According to my comprehension, "prevent" is to stop completely and "impede" to try by any means to sabotage and to prevent it. The meanings are different, what is the real meaning of "impedir" in Spanish?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tom873317
Tom873317
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Ive seen discussions on here indicating that impedir actually is closer to 'prevent' than 'impede'. That's definitely how Duo prefers it, and im starting to think it's just a false cognate.

Still looking for a Spanish word for 'impede' though!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Markmcopc
Markmcopc
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Why does the Spanish require that "the" is indispensable to the English sentence in this case?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

In this sentence "cooperation" is an abstract noun, and that is the key to your question. Spanish requires the definite article on abstract nouns, whereas English omits it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aidan8
aidan8
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DL accepts it without the article now

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregAngeli

No it does't, it flagged me for not using la

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aidan8
aidan8
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I meant in Spanish to English translation.. These comments are common to all the variations. In Spanish "la" is required, but in English "the" is optional. In English "the cooperation" sounds a bit stilted for this example.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

I suppose because it is a specific case of cooperation that could be impeded ????

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Markmcopc
Markmcopc
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I´m asking about the rule that determines when the Spanish article is significant for translation to English and when it is not. The question is, what is it in Spanish that determines that in this case the definite article is required in English? Duolingo says that it is wrong to translate this sentence "They can prevent cooperation". By what rule?

Think of another example: "Ellos pueden impedir la educación" Isn´t the article required here in Spanish? But it is not required in English: "They can prevent education". Why is this case different? .

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

"The question is, what is it in Spanish that determines that in this case the definite article is required in English? Duolingo says that it is wrong to translate this sentence "They can prevent cooperation". By what rule?" Answer: None, IMO.

The rules of Spanish do not determine when we use articles in English, just as the rules of English do not tell us when we must use articles in Spanish. In Spanish, there are often hard and fast "rules" about the use of the article, but sometimes it is a fuzzy area. I often asked my teachers in Argentina and Mexico about using a Spanish article, or not, and I got a shrug of the shoulders, a smile, and a look of "whatever!"

In the case of the above sentence, I think the Duo computer simply made a poor translation, and no human has seen fit to fix it. I don't there is a 'rule' involved. We use articles in English to make good English, and sometimes Duo messes up, IMO.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Markmcopc
Markmcopc
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I don´t think there are any rules that are really hard and fast in any language, are there? But if you´re saying that the English translation without the article sounds like it means the same thing as the Spanish sentence with the article, then that answers my question.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thepkl

...but hopefully you have now learned that Duolingo likes articles and they will not mark you wrong when you use them even when you don't need them. I popped in here just to see who used the article and who didn't. I know better now so I translate it all the time.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Mark, I would say in English rules about capitalization are strict. (christmas never falls in november.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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intender. A little tricky to understand that verb.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lindafraser
lindafraser
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Estoy de acuerdo! ;-) I couldn't make out the verb either.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charley-Farley

It sounded like 'interir' - certainly not 'impedir'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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Yes ; I repeated it about 10 times and couldn't make it out. I tried intervir though I knew it was probably wrong

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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I got it wrong after listening to it repeatedly again. As in English, we just have to remember certain cliches, like cooperation often goes with "impedir".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sjmartin55

I couldn't understand her either, on that word, AND the last word! Sounded like "compación" , and under the subject of government, it wasn't too much of a stretch to interpret "They can prevent compassion"...dang!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lphoenix

So far I've seen DL define "impedir" as "to hinder," "to block," and now "to prevent." Nowhere do they accept "impede," which is really the best translation. But if DL thinks that "to hinder" something is the same as "to prevent" something, they're so wrong. You can impede, hinder, delay something but that does not mean you will prevent it. I see "evitar" given as a verb for "to prevent" in my dictionary--is this accurate? Or is there a more specific and precise verb?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Syran
Syran
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Good to know: impedir and evitar are synonyms and both mean prevent.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eloplop2
eloplop2
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I was wondering if "They can avoid cooperation" could be right...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beth.hause

They can block the cooperation is a correct translation. Please correct. Thanks

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidlmontgomery

agreed, beth hause. but to get a correction we have to use the report feature, not just post to the discussion

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Spanielle2

how about...harm? still makes a perfectly correct sentence

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielKristensen

They can prevent her cooperation - was not accepted?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tom873317
Tom873317
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'La' isn't possessive - it would have to be 'su cooperación'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jopvandijk
jopvandijk
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Is "they can block the cooperation" wrong? Not native english.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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It's not wrong. I personally would use "they can interfere with the cooperation", but "block" is just fine. July 13, 2015

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jopvandijk
jopvandijk
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Thx, and I'll take that habit to write the date when suggesting a correct solution.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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Oh! Thank you! I realized a while back that it would be nice to know just how ancient a conversation was. Since DL doesn't date stamp the posts, I thought that at least the ones I date stamped would help others figure our if their response would be timely enough.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LBracht
LBracht
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what is the problem with "avoid" in place of "evitar" ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lynn5655

Why is "they can stop cooperating" not correct?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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Oct 30, 2015 - "they can stop cooperating" does not convey the same meaning as "They can prevent (or impede) the cooperation.". The first sentence definitely assumes THEY were cooperating to begin with, while the second sentence makes no assumption about whether THEY were initially cooperating or not. The Spanish sentence allows for a third party, THEY, intervening to stop the cooperation between two (or more) other parties.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lynn5655

Thanks, makes sense. I think I was viewing the "the" as unnecessary, as so many of the spanish "the"s are. :(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nckoch

"They are able to impede the cooperation" should be accepted also

2 years ago
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