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https://www.duolingo.com/Firekraker

Irish help possibly?

I'm using two different programs to learn Irish as I am moving to Ireland in a little over a month. I noticed right off the bat that some words have the same translation but slightly different spelling (the easiest to remember is bread: arán or t-arán for the other software.) Is this just a difference in the area of dialect? If there are any native or fluent Irish speakers here, which should I focus on?? Thank you!

1 year ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

They're the same word with different meanings. arán is 'bread', an t-arán is 'the bread'. The reason it changes is because Irish has something that is known as initial mutations, where the beginning of a word changes in certain contexts. There's two lessons about them on DL (eclipses and lenition). I suggest unlocking those and reading the notes (so you need to use the browser, not an app), or read the overview on Wikipedia here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_initial_mutations.

That said, you won't need Irish in Ireland at all; everyone who speaks Irish is also a native speaker of English and, for most the country, English is the preferred tongue.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Firekraker

Ok, thank you! I know that I don't need Irish, but I would like to be as immersed as possible when I head over there

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

The thing is, you won't be immersed unless you're moving to a Gaeltacht area. And the it'll take time, because they'll know you're not from there and will likely speak English with you out of politeness.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paolobrien
paolobrien
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You won't learn enough Irish in a few weeks to be of much use to you, unless you're a language genius.. Virtually everyone in Ireland speaks good English, unless they are a recent immigrant from Latvia or wherever (and the first thing you will notice is that half the population seem to be recent immigrants from Latvia or wherever). That said, it will do you a lot of good to learn a few simple words in Irish - hello, please, thanks, goodbye and the like - and also maybe a couple of Irish phrases or proverbs (do a Google search). Most Irish people will be bowled over that a foreigner has gone to the trouble to get their head around a bit of Irish, no matter how small it is. It's a real ice-breaker. Oh, and welcome to Ireland :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OliverCasserley

@firekraker it would be a good idea to learn the meaning of the few road traffic signs that are displayed as gaeilge- especially if you are driving in Gaeltacht areas.. Fáilte go éireann.

1 year ago