https://www.duolingo.com/parasdox

Why is "noch" used in these sentences? And why does this sentence mean what it does?

Sentence 1: "Und noch weintrauben, bitte" = "And grades, please" Sentence 2: "Noch etwas?" = "Anything else?"

To my understanding, "noch" means "still," so it doesn't make any sense to me why it's used in dialogue like the sentences above!

And lastly, how does "Was darf's denn sein?" mean "What would you like to buy?"

July 24, 2017

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Multitaal

These are idiomatic expressions. Similar sentence constructions are also used in Dutch by shoppers and shop owners. So I feel confident about their meaning.

Noch can also mean in addition.
Literal translations:
1. And in addition (to that I would like) grapes, please.
2. (Would you like) in addition something?
3. What may it be? Meaning: what can I get you?

July 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Multi0Lingual4

Perhaps this will help (for noch): https://yourdailygerman.com/2014/03/10/meaning-noch/

Edit for your second question: according to Google Translate, it kind of means 'so what will it be?' which would make sense.

I will never understand random words inserted in German sentences. And I thought 'ya' was hard in Spanish...

July 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/LateBlt

You are right that "noch" usually means "still", and I think this makes sense when you think about the sentences... If someone asks you "Noch etwas?", that basically means "Is there still something else?" Similarly, you can traslate "Und noch weintrauben, bitte" as "And still wine grapes, please", as in "After everything else, I would still like some wine grapes."

"Was darf's denn sein?" translates literally as "What may it then be?" Often in English, people taking your order in a store or restaurant will say something like "What'll it be?" The same effect works here.

July 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Maureen605866

Sentence 1: und noch Weintrauben bitte = and some grapes please - and lastly "was darf's denn sein?" I guess you could translate with "what can I offer you? - - - noch etwas Geduld ! and you will master it ;-)

July 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Hannibal-Barkas

Sentence 1: in addition to all the stuff I already ordered, I would like to buy grapes. Noch meaning in addition to

Sentence 2: in addition to the apples, the oranges and the grapes, do yu want/need something else?

Sentence 3: Now that you have seen all of my merchandise, what is it you want to buy?

If you go to dict.leo.org you will find a dozen different meanings to "noch", beginning with "still" and "yet" like in noch nicht - not yet.

July 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/JahMahQ.

I really think you are right,somehow.. Sentence 1: "Und noch weintrauben, bitte" = "And grades, please" could also be "And (additional) grapes, please." at least that is what the sentence means! ;) In this case "noch" means "noch dazu" which means addional ..or if the grapes are already empty, you can order more by saying "Und noch weintrauben, bitte"

Sentence 2: "Noch etwas?" = "Anything else?" "Noch etwas" is short for "Darf es noch etwas sein" and that is translated to would you like anything else, which put shortly is "Anything else?" (Anyway it's originaly taken from very old german..if someone says it, you should just here the words "meine Dame" in your mind attached..which means "my lady")

"Was darf's denn sein?" that is someting they just say in restaurants and pubs (Wirtshäser & Kneipen) ...also is very old german/austrian/swiss in fact ... It was more like "Was darf's denn sein der Herr?" ..very vienna!!! ..meaning "What would you like to drink, sir?" It really just means What would you like to have - "sein" is to be interpreted as "to have" in this case! Or maybe "Was darf es denn sein, was sie gerne hätten?" meaning in oldschool english "What shall it be that you desire?" (and I dont know oldschool english at all exept from movies!)

Bahahha..Ijust read my post...pretty confusing right?

But it's really just something to remember...nothing attached to it to make a rule or so!!

July 31, 2017
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