https://www.duolingo.com/kylmark

Finished your tree? How "fluent" are you?

I wanted to ask anyone that has finished their german tree how well they actually can speak the language now. Especially if you didn't know any german at all before starting. I figure only finishing the tree wont get you that far but maybe I'm wrong?

4 years ago

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/nathansk8s
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I finished my tree a couple weeks ago and I can have basic conversations in German. Talk about my day and the things I like and make some what complex sentences with a few mistakes here and there. I studied for 1 to 2 hours a day for the past 8 months though, and I use other things to help me . I use lingq.com to read things and help me pronounce words correctly because reading is very important once you have a basic grasp on the language. Then you also have to speak more so I use conversationexchange.com to find Germans to skype with. This helps a lot I have learned so much from people in Germany. Then I watch youtube videos in German all the time constantly focusing on how native speakers speak. This helps my pronunciation and with more fluent speech. I can't tell you how I would be If I just used duolingo. Duolingo is amazing but it will just teach you the basics. How well you speak write read and listen is all up to you and what you use to supplement your duolingo course material. All this being said If you study your tree very well I think most people come out with an A2 level on average. Which depends if you have experience with learning foreign languages or not and many other variables. Language learning is really difficult to measure I think.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fathia835001
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That was a nice information for me. Maybe i can try it, too

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/evilmeow

I am two lesson groups away from the end of the tree (I am delaying it on purpose), and it's pretty much just vocabulary there at this point. I officially started duo last summer, knowing only 2 words in German (Scheiße und Katzen), but I gave up quickly, restarted in the middle of September, and got serious in December, adding some reading and practice from a library book and other websites.

Right now I can read easy texts, I can understand some clear speech, I can communicate a bit in writing, but not complicated ideas, and I still make mistakes with adjective endings and pronouns. I haven't really had the chance to practice conversation skills. When I took an A2 test on the Deutsche Welle website, the result said I'd be fine taking a class geared towards B1 (the test result was around 70%, though I take this with a grain of salt because they didn't test my speech). I hope this helps giving you a rough idea of my progress.

Also - I find duolingo to be a good motivator for learning, even if it doesn't offer all the resources that are needed for grammar and immersion in the language.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98
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scheiße und Katzen is 3 words to me

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/evilmeow

Haha, my brain switched to German there and I didn't realize it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amitskanda

Brainiac, multilingual dude you are!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0liwia
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Lol!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattyMan129

20 LANGUAGES

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackk_
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❤❤❤❤ and cats.... well done! XD

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kirillkula

I had almost the same experience, I started around July for a week. Then I took it seriously in September, tried to keep it around 40-50 points per day which took me roughly 90 minutes. By the end of January I was done with the tree. Since then I started focusing on Spanish so I had to drop my focus from German. I just took the A2 test on DW with a score of 69%.

Although duo is a great website/app, it has a lack of natural spoken language (which can be fulfilled other websites) and intensive grammatical exercises - I still don't know exactly where should I use dem, den...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/evilmeow

Hah, wow, we're like German-learning twins :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kirillkula

Ok... apparently we both speak Russian and Hebrew as well.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/evilmeow

Hahaha, yes, and as first languages... (I was raised in Israel). So we're pretty much linguistic twins!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Turtle492
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I wouldn't worry about adjective endings too much - I've been learning German for years and I still get them wrong as often as right, but I don't think it's that important most of the time (especially if there's already an article). I think spoken fluency is far more important than getting adjective endings right - the only way you can really get that is by chatting with a native speaker. If you can find a local tandem partner (Sprachpartner/in) that would be the best way, or you can try sites like italki. You might be able to find an Email tandem partner through SprachDuo. If you correct each other's mistakes that could help with your written communication.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SvetlozarT

evilmeow is right that duolingo is a good motivator. It's not the perfect learning platform, but it's the best platform that turns language learning into fun and get's you going. And since English is not my native language, I don't just learn German but practice my English as a main language. I simultaneously learn German from multiple sources, but the motivation comes from duolingo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dudly
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^ This. Foot-in-the-door-platform, yes. My question would be, why would you want to use only Duolingo? I think Duolingo is nice in this way that you can clearly see your progress (by achieving skills and levelling up and all) and it is easy to be motivated enough to do it everyday and to complete it.

However, once you did get started learning, then I find that I cannot really help myself checking more stuff out. People bring up grammar rules in Sentence Discussions; they sometimes link to amazing pages that are very insightful and very useful in learning the language. So many discussions are posted in the General Discussions or specific language discussions -- and I think once you get involved with Duolingo, you'd be missing out if you were not curious enough to look around and branch out, a little bit. Why would you not want to read the song recommendations posted for the language you're learning, or cartoons, or movies? It's fun, and it feels pretty good when you start to understand more of it!

I know that does not really answer your question (I did not finish my tree anyway, but for me, I could not have just stuck to the tree anyway). But it asks you another one -- why are you learning German, if not to be able to use it outside of Duolingo? And then, why not start already? Also, have to say, people regularly post about how they've completed X-Y language tree. You can always check these threads out.

viel Spaß beim Deutschlernen!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fathia835001
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Before start duo, i just know "ich liebe dich" and "danke". I just finished the whole tree yesterday, and i think i can read some sentence now, that's very nice. But i have no confidence to try to chat in German or make a sentence, just like that. I need a lot of improvement

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Godoflais

I finished my tree like three weeks ago, and ever since i've been trying to turn all the lessons gold, but it seems to me like an impossible task. Anyway, I can watch a movie and understand like the 80% of the words, however i can't say i can speak the language yet. I can express some short ideas like "ich mag dein Keid" or "Ich kann ein paar Worte sagen", but I seriously doubt being able to stablish a conversation.

Allthough, i want to express my thankfulness to the Duolingo team because I wanted to learn German since i was 18 (now i'm 28) and always found an excuse not to do so, but Duolingo is an easy way to get started and now i have all the motivation to continue learning and become a fluent speaker. Now i am a week away from starting my German course in a language school, so no more excuses!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BRO_Dwarez

Though I'm not that far through my tree (just reached accusative pronouns) I can hold basic conversation about some foods, clothing, animals and family. I try to speak it as much as I can in order to practice and become more fluent. Though I don't come to Duolingo every day (I sometimes take a week or so off at a time) I still find I'm learning well and becoming fluent. Luckily, I have the virtue of German friends. who can correct grammatical mistakes and cement my knowledge by speaking with me. I'd highly recommend reaching out to native speakers in order to improve your fluency and knowledge. Listening to their conversations can also be useful. It is probably the best way of "indirectly" learning, in my opinion.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JimmiDee
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I went to Germany just before completing my German tree (I think I had 1 or 2 topics to complete) and lived there for five months. Interestingly I didn't actually finish until returning home. When I arrived in Germany, I couldn't understand anything. It took some time for me to get used to the hearing the language in use (different regional accents and the speed of speech). Most of the people I encountered in Germany spoke to me in English, though many progressively used more and more German to try and teach me. I still wouldn't say I am fluent, though I can comprehend enough to tutor someone studying German at university who is about A2+ (if you are familiar with the CEFR). My humble opinion is that unless you have a super power you need to actually converse with real people in a language to ever become good at it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Turtle492
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I studied German for 7 years at school and for 2 years at uni (as a minor subject) - I got really good grades so I figured I must speak German quite well. And then did a year abroad in Germany - when I got there I could barely understand anything! I found people were very friendly and tried to help though, and after a couple of months I started to understand what people were saying when they asked me things in the street. It definitely takes a lot of adjustment, even if you've been working at the language for years, so I wouldn't expect to go to Germany and fall into easy conversation with a native, no matter how far you are in the Duo tree.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fuzzisieiro

This is a phonological problem, though. You knew grammar, but it took a time for you to get used with the sounds of the language. At school and uni, the focus tends to be on grammar...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zo-gay-binch

This last part is very true,conversing with people that are fluent is VITAL in learning the language. I suggest this app called "HelloTalk". It allows you to speak to people from the country that speaks the language youre learning,it matches you with people in the same position as you! So,I speak with people from France that are fluent in French but need help in English,and i speak fluent English but i need help in French so we converse and help each other out! It's really amazing,do give it a try

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hristina96705

Hello, i learnt a lot german language. Thank you Duolingo

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fuzzisieiro

Hi, Mark. I will try to give you my opinion as an English teacher and a linguist. For me, Duolingo is a very effective tool for giving you a general understanding of the language's syntax and phonology. Once you have this general notion, all you have to do is add the vocabulary. It is as if you had an abstract structure waiting to be filled with the language's vocabulary. Well, at least this is my first impression of Duolingo. I still need more time and practice with the website to confirm this hypothesis/idea. However, as Nathan wisely wrote, if you want to learn a foreign language well, you should look for as many language sources as you can. Currently, I speak Portuguese, English, and German. Portuguese is my mother tongue. I started learning English at the age of 10 and German at 19. I'm 25 now, and I still think there's a lot to learn in both languages. Nevertheless, if I may suggest a standard, I'd say it takes roughly 1200 to master a language that stemms from the same pro-language as yours, i.e English and German; Portuguese and Spanish. I hope this information was useful. Till next time!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ebrill_April

I finished the German tree recently, but I also took an intensive German course. :/ I think the tree is a good motivator, but you won't be anywhere near fluent at the end of it. I can understand my mother-in-law, for example, most of the time, but I still struggle to speak with her.

If you pass the tree, I think your German will be around B1, which is pretty good. :D After that, you'll need to speak and read of lot of German in order to reach that wonderful C1/2 grade. ( o )

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Turtle492
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I already speak German to a higher level than Duo teaches but I completed the tree a while back as revision, and I'd say it gives you a good grounding in all of the key grammar you need. It could do with some better explanations of some things but hopefully you can find them on other sites. There's maybe a lack of phrases (some of the advanced vocab lists on Memrise are good for this) and not enough explanation of cases. Reading widely should help - I'd recommend getting the German version of a novel you know well in English (the first one I got was Harry Potter, definitely choose one aimed at children/teenagers rather than adults) and work your way through it, with the English version alongside if necessary.

What I'm finding with Spanish is that although I'm getting on well with the tree, and I think I can cope with written Spanish quite well, I don't understand much spoken Spanish from other sites - I don't think I could have a conversation with a native speaker.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paola143151

I don't know how to see how fluent i am. How do i see that?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TrailerParkJihad

I believe the placement test on this website is used to find your fluency:

http://www.dw.com/en/learn-german/s-2469

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shay545577

Good question

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samuel_Ven

1

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arriondas
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hi

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SimonJWilliams

Can somebody explain how this works for me?

I've been trying out Duolingo as I'm encouraging my 8 year old to use it to keep her French fresh.

I'm fluent in German so I thought I'd fly through the course to check it out. In the past 12 days or so I've completed the course. So I've a 100% golden tree.

But it now says I'm at level 13 and am 54% fluent. Whilst I'm not hung up on what Duolingo considers to be fluent ... if I've completed the course surely it should say 100% ... and I thought there were more levels than 13?

Any insight from fellow language nerds?

;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yosan88

Is your tree still all gold? Maybe they (Duolingo) just wants you to practice to stay all gold because the same thing happened to me. You have to constantly practice (YOU don't because you're already fluent) in order to have 100%.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kylmark

Well you can finish the tree and not be fluent, of course. Duolingo won't teach you the ENTIRE language. At best duolingo can teach you enough to be able to have basic conversations and handle yourself in everyday situations. Just because you complete a chemistry course in high school doesn't mean you know everything about chemistry ;)

2 years ago
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