https://www.duolingo.com/HenryJTyson

How Do I Stay Motivated?

I know people who responded to my last discussion will see this. How do I stay motivated when learning a language? Should I learn a lot in one go? Should I go easy on myself? Any feedback would be appreciated.

1 year ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Speir_
Speir_
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Motivation is crucially important; what are your intentions, and why are you focused on learning a language? Duolingo intended for the streak to be a good source of motivation, which it has been for me: I've progressed, and I have a streak to keep me going. Making an effort to learning one language at a time might be better for you; learning multiple at once is much more challenging.

Learning a lot at once won't be as effective; you'll remember more if you consistently go at a steady pace rather than racing through the material (you'll most likely forget more of the material taught with this method). So going easy on yourself might be better (although, even when I'm not in a mood, I push myself to do it).

Memorizing the words isn't everything to learning a language; you need a concentration, a motivation, a plan, progress, and time, time, time!

Good luck with your experience!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HenryJTyson

Thank you for your time and thank you for helping me :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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It might be easier for you if you were to focus on one language at a time. Is there one that you especially like? Try to do just a little bit every day even if it's only one lesson.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HenryJTyson

I really like Esperanto and I don't find it hard (yet). I'm thinking of learning Italian after. What do I do about the grammar, because I have tried Italian before and given up.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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I find it helpful to concentrate on one language tree at a time. So, you might consider doing just the esperanto tree for now. Everyone has questions about grammar in the beginning since every language has a unique way of doing things. You can look stuff up online, ask questions here in the forum, use google to search for previous questions on Duolingo, or get a grammar book on Esperanto. Be sure to read any tips and notes for a skill before doing any lessons.

Learning a language can be hard sometimes but if you really like it that can give you the motivation to keep going and it feels great after you've gotten past something that used to seem challenging before.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HenryJTyson

Thank you very much :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Katykate_1

Staying motivated 24/7 is probably not possible, it comes and goes. You gotta force yourself a little bit when it's gone, but yeah. What are your goals? Do you want to live in Spain? Or do you learn it just for fun? Goals are important :3

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HenryJTyson

I'm learning Esperanto for fun. I am thinking of learning Italian or Norwegian after I (hopefully) become fluent in Esperanto.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DragonPolyglot
DragonPolyglot
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Motivation is probably one of the hardest things to do for language learning. Firstly, you'll need to remind yourself sometimes why you want to learn a language in the first place, especially while hurdling over the toughest challenges. I prefer to focus on a few small things, like animal names or conjugation, each day. I also know people who just learn at least one thing every day and others who rush through everything and then go back to review several times. Try experimenting and see what works best for you. I also recommend doing things like reading about the culture(s) or exposing yourself to the media (TV, music, books, etc) in the language regularly.

Phrases like "slow and steady wins the race", "practice makes perfect" and "follow your heart" are good things to keep in mind while learning a language.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HenryJTyson

This was very helpful. Thank you very much.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HenryJTyson

Also, how should I pace myself? With me, I want to learn a language as fast as I can, and then I forget everything and give up. What shall I do?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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I agree with DragonPolyglot that "slow and steady" wins the race. People who say they want to learn a language fast often do give up. (There was a video I saw about this recently but I need to find it.) If you choose to learn a language in a way that you enjoy "follow your heart," then it will probably be easier to pace yourself and be more consistent.

p.s. Although some people can force themselves to do things that they don't want to do, I'm not one of those people. However, I am able to force myself to do things that I generally enjoy. Fortunately, I love learning languages!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DragonPolyglot
DragonPolyglot
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If you decide to do it paced quickly, be sure to review a lot. Repetition is important. I personally find that a slower pace helps you remember words more accurately for a longer time. Start out with somewhere between 10-20 words a week. Some people are very slow learners but can remember words for a long time. Others need to be constantly exposed to it to even start using it but they are able to pick up on more words at a time. Most people are somewhere in the middle. Personally I'm a little slower but I can handle a large amount of information given to me given a few weeks to learn it. Marathons don't help me at all and I don't like to move on until I feel confident with half of the things I have been learning. Go easy at first and then bump it up if it feels too easy. Sometimes you might just have to go easy on yourself for a few days but it's better than not practicing at all.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HenryJTyson

Thank you for your time :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gigicher

Sometimes you need to force yourself to study even if you don't want to. I'm sorry but motivation comes and goes. You can't rely on that

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thebenoch
Thebenoch
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I think it's better to keep going a little every day, rather than doing a lot in one go and getting burnt out. I used to go crazy on a particularly motivated day, only to be tired and reward myself for the hard work by not studying at all. These days I do anywhere from 40-150 Duolingo points each day, and I supplement that with attempting to read comics, audio mp3s, etc.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HenryJTyson

Thanks :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MiriamPitt5

Try first to start with easy languages- one at a time. French or dutch or something like that would be good to begin. Try to do as many things as possible to stay motivated!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HenryJTyson

Thank you! But what can I do to STAY motivated?

1 year ago
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