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Modal verbs WILL, SHOULD, etc.

General principles

The auxiliary modals "would", "may", "might", "should", "must", "ought to", "can", "could", "will", "shall" are invariable. They exist only in the present, and unlike most verbs in the simple present, their form does not change in the third person singular.

Modal verbs are auxiliaries, or "helping" verbs: they are used in conjunction with another verb (in infinitive form) as a way to modify its meaning. Modals can nuance the meaning of the principal verb in a number of ways: – Possibility or ability, by "can" or "could"

<pre>I can do this job. Could you please do the dishes? </pre>

–Possibility or permission by "may" or "might" often translated in other languages by a different mood, such as the subjunctive).

<pre>I may finish my paper tonight. You may come with us, if you wish. It might be helpful to have a map. </pre>

– Obligation, or moral obligation, by "must", "ought to" o "should":

<pre>Students must hand in their work on time. You ought to see a doctor. You should never play with fire. </pre>

Note that "must" can also indicate probability:

<pre>You must be exhausted! He must play tennis pretty well. </pre>

The modal verb "would" is used to express the conditional:

<pre>If he had time, he would pick up some groceries. </pre>

The modal verb "will" expresses future:

<pre>The train will arrive in an hour. </pre>

Contractions

After a pronoun subject, "would" is often contracted into "–'d" ("I'd", "we'd", "she'd", etc.) while "will" is contracted into "–'ll" ("I'll", "you'll", "they'll", etc.). After all modal verbs, the word "not" of the negative can be contracted into "–n't" ("wouldn't", "shouldn't", etc.).

Exceptions: "will not" becomes "won't". "Can not" can also be written "cannot"; in its contracted form, the "n" is not doubled: "can't".

Note: The contraction of the modal verbs "shall," "ought," and "may," is considered slightly archaic or literary.

examples of contractions:

<pre>I wouldn't (would not) do that, if I were you! They'll (they will) never believe it! She won't (will not) bother you anymore. </pre>

Question tag phrases ("isn't it," "wasn't it," etc.)

Modals can be used in a negative interrogative form after an affirmative expression. The function of such an expression is to prompt the listener to reassert or reaffirm what has been stated:

<pre>You would like to go with us, wouldn't you? You can understand that, can't you? </pre>

The modal verb used in the interrogative tag is generally the same as the modal found in the main clause; the subject pronoun is also repeated.

After a negative sentence, the modal tag phrase is in the affirmative:

<pre>You wouldn't want to try it, would you? She won't be back, will she? </pre>
Hace 4 años

5 comentarios


https://www.duolingo.com/Dombina

I licke your summary. Thanks!

Hace 4 años

https://www.duolingo.com/djorgeivan

Excelente info, gracias :D

Hace 4 años

https://www.duolingo.com/3134856537

exelent

Hace 3 años

https://www.duolingo.com/AlanFormst

Very nice explanation. Thanks

Hace 2 años

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Beginning with the second example are MISTAKES. THESE TWO are WRONG, (Below, following, I correct them)

Example #3 preStudents must hand in their work on time. You ought to see a doctor. You should never play with fire. /pre Note that "must" can also indicate probability: NOT TRUE

Examples#4 preI may finish my paper tonight. You may come with us, if you wish. It might be helpful to have a map. /pre – Obligation, or moral obligation, by "must", "ought to" o "should": THIS DOESN'T RELATE TO THE EXAMPLE.

Beginning with # 4, the EXPLANATION is NOT PROPERLY LINKED TO the EXAMPLE

Below are the CORRECTED :

The word "may" or "might" indicate "possibility" or "permission." The word "might" does not indicate probability.

preI may finish my paper tonight. (Possibility) You may come with us, if you wish. (Permission)

It might be helpful to have a map. (Possibility)
"Might I come with you?" = "may I come with you" = Asking Permission. "I might come with you" = possibility.

"I may finish my paper tonight." = "I might finish my paper tonight." (Both Possibility)

Note that "must" can also indicate probability: preYou must be exhausted! He must play tennis pretty well. /pre

The modal verbs "would" and "could" are used to express the conditional: preIf he had time, he would/could pick up some groceries. /pre ("would" = intent, or probability"' ; "could" = possibility.")

The modal verb "would" can also indicate subjunctive. "If he would have time, he could..." = "Were he to have time, he could..." = "if he were to have time, he could.... ("Were" is subjunctive)

The modal verb "will" expresses future: preThe train will arrive in an hour. /pre

Contractions

After a pronoun subject, "would" is often contracted into "–'d" ("I'd", "we'd", "she'd", etc.) while "will" is contracted into "–'ll" ("I'll", "you'll", "they'll", etc.).

After all modal verbs, the word "not" of the negative can be contracted into "–n't" ("wouldn't", "shouldn't", etc.).

Exceptions: "will not" becomes "won't". "Can not"should be written as "cannot"; in its contracted form, the "n" is not doubled: "can't".

Hace 1 año