"When do you work?"

Translation:いつしごとをしますか?

1 year ago

45 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/GeloTress

There is no audio for the kanji, why is that?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/giorgishen1

Same

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DominicSal294966

Yeah, weird. And that kanji 仕事 means shigoto/work, so that's kind of critical. After several times of getting it wrong, I went and looked it up and figured it out on my own....

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/developedby

Why is it wrong to ommit the 'wo' particle in his case but not in other cases?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WinfieldTrail

Why does the Duolingo robovoice consistently pronounce しごと as しもと?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

I hear shigoto, perhaps it's a problem with your device/headphones/speaker/app.

It's also possible that you're mishearing. I don't think the audio doesn't do it in this case, but Japanese people tend to pronounce their "g"s rather nasally, so it sounds like "ng" like is "sing". This varies across different regions in Japan, and with different individuals, but that could be why it sounds like an "m" to you.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Il-Mentore

Perhaps we do have different recordings... Mine also sounds like a lips-pressed-together 'm' instead of a nasally 'g'. I do get occassional nasally 'g's, but not in this word.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

Perhaps. I don't hear a nasally "g" in this recording, both on the desktop version and my Android app (speakers and headphones), but it doesn't sound remotely like an "m" to me either.

It might be due to different native languages causing our perceptions of the same sound to change. Native Japanese speakers had a very hard time distinguishing between "l" and "r" sounds, despite native English speakers hearing them as very clearly different sounds. Perhaps "m" in your native language just happens to sound similar to the "g" in this recording.

Having had a fair bit of experience listening to native Japanese speakers, I do think the pronunciation in the recording (if it is indeed the same) is accurate though, if somewhat robotic.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/trishka9
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I've noticed occasionally (not often) that the same word will have different Duolingo voices, so my guess is you're actually hearing two different versions of the word.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DominicSal294966

I have the same issue, not sure it might be a weird pronunciation thing with Duolingo. Or a weird pronunciation thing with Japanese... hard to tell for sure

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/I.gor1
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Isn't the "anata wa" usually understood? Leaving it off the beginning shouldn't make the sentence incorrect.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Limeila
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I left it off and got "correct" :)

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mwelsh
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Could you say いつ はたらきます?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SnowyYuki

you have to add "ka" at the end since it is a question.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seratanto

But doesn't Itsu have a question in it? Itsu = when. So why double question?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/trishka9
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When isn't always a question - e.g. I'll go to work when I've finished studying.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

Fair point, but while "when" might behave like that in English, いつ is usually a question word (strangely, when you add か directly after it, it becomes the adverb "sometime").

To answer @seratanto's question, the role of か is to make the sentence grammatically a question. But, a question can be "yes/no" or open-ended, right? いつ is used to define the scope of the question to be open-ended.

You could think of か changing the sentence from "I do work" to "Do you work?", then いつ makes it "Do you work? when?" or "When do you work?"

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phil457108

Why anata wa if not needed?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phi1010
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what's wrong with <kanji>はいつをしますか? how is that kanji written?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

This kanji 仕事? I typed しごと in Windows IME and pressed spacebar to get it.

As for your sentence, it's grammatically incorrect because the を shouldn't be attached to the question word いつ. The を indicates that the verb acts on "when", not the other way around ("when" modifies the verb) as it should be. 仕事はいつしますか? should be an acceptable answer.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CaueJ.
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Could I use 仕事はいつですか?

Doesn't いつ need a に particle for referring to the time?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

Yes, 仕事はいつですか is also correct.

Actually, particles are postpositions, unlike the prepositions we're used to in English. So, the は in these sentences is acting on 仕事.

いつ doesn't need a particle in your sentence, because it is the object of です. In my sentence, いつ can use the particle に to connect to します, but it's very commonly left out because いつ is an "adverbial noun" so it modifies します directly.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phantom961
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I'm no pro but from what I've seen usually verbs are followed by the wa particle so they tend to be in the end of a sentence. Japanese follows the SOV rule (subject-object-verb) structure so that's the best I can explain. Also, 仕事pronounced (しごと) shigoto!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sdfjeg
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仕事 = しごと

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Limeila
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Thanks, that's the comment I was looking for!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LukasGroth
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What about 何時働きますか?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

That's very subtly different. 何時 (なんじ) means "what time", and is typically answered with a specific time, e.g. "3 o'clock".

On the other hand, いつ means "when" and is a lot broader in scope. You could answer with a specific time, or a time period (e.g. "9 to 5"), even open-ended times such as "from Monday", depending on the context.

The difference between 働きます and 仕事をします is even subtler still. 働きます means "to work", but it also has connotations of "to labor". On the other hand, 仕事をします is literally "to do work" or "to do (one's) job".

Therefore, you may 働きます while you 仕事をします, but you don't necessarily have to; perhaps your job isn't very challenging or laborious. You can equally 働きます while doing something other than 仕事.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/insanity54

Is there any difference in saying「 いつはしごとですか 」?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/impromptu_stdio

Yes. I reccomend you check out imabi.net. Go to beginner 1 and read the 2 lessons on the ka particle. It covers in depth word order like this and directness/harshness

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Israndiel2

I heard somewhere that when the subject (I, you, etc.) is clear you don't necessarily have to put it in the sentence (like in the beginning of the Japanese course). Is it, or is it not true here? It's kinda obvious I mean you, and not "I". Like with "いつべんきょうしますか?", you don't put あなた at the beginning. Is it becouse the last sentence needs を?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

It is true here, that the あなたは isn't strictly necessary if it's obvious by the context. You could also be asking "when do I (start) work", so there may be situations when you want to make sure the listener knows you are talking about them.

With いつべんきょうしますか, you don't have to put あなたは at the beginning, but you can. You can also interpret it as "when do we study", so again, if you want to be absolutely sure the listener knows you're talking about them, you would add あなたは.

It doesn't have anything to do with を ;)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnasBombat

Can somebody go through は, を and が

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

Sure. I'll start with the easiest one first. Remember that particles in Japanese are post-positions, so they point at the thing that came before them.

: the "direct object" particle. It indicates what the verb of the sentence is acting on. This can be an actual physical object, like "a table", or an abstract non-physical idea, like "a dream".

: the "subject" particle. It indicates what is doing the verb of the sentence.

It also has a couple of other grammatical functions, mainly to indicate the target of a preference/skill/desire, and as a formal emphasis particle meaning "but/though".

: the "topic" particle. This one is probably the most difficult to conceptualize in English. It is used to provide some grammatical context to the sentence, and you can think of it as indicating what the sentence is about.

In many cases, it can also supersede the other particles, elevating importance of the "direct object" or the "subject" in the sentence to the role of "topic", for added emphasis in questions or negative statements.

Here's a few examples, adding the particles in one by one, so you can get an idea of what they add to the sentence.

  • ごはん食べます = "I eat rice" (the "I" is the implied subject in this case, since we don't have any other context)
  • 田中さんごはん食べます = "Mr/Ms Tanaka eats rice"
  • 朝ごはん田中さんごはん食べます = "Mr/Ms Tanaka eats rice for breakfast"

  • おちゃ飲みません = "I don't drink tea" (は is taking over を's role here as the "direct object" particle, and emphasizing おちゃ as the topic at the same time)

  • ジョンさんおちゃ飲みません = "(Mr) John doesn't drink tea" (おちゃ is relegated back to being the direct object, since ジョンさん is more important in this case. ジョンさん is the subject, but is also being emphasized as the topic)
  • おちゃジョンさん飲みません = "(Mr) John doesn't drink tea" (the English translation is identical, but this sentence is very subtly different in Japanese due to the difference in emphasis. A possible situation this would be used in is if you were trying to decide what drink to serve everyone, and someone suggests tea, but "when it comes to tea, (Mr) John doesn't drink (it)". "Tea" is the topic of the conversation, thus は is used)
11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnasBombat

I thought します means will do. What's the actual difference between します and あります

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

It's difficult to explain concisely, since both します and ありますare rather flexible verbs in Japanese, but bear with me. Firstly, both words, and in fact all verbs that end in ます, are generally called simple present/non-past tense verbs, because they can all refer to general statements, habitual actions or future actions. So in the rest of this explanation, I'll only say things like "to do" or "to be", but keep in mind that this is equally "will do" or "will be".

します: most commonly translated as "to do", but it is the generic way to "verb-ify" a noun in Japanese.

For example, 勉強【べんきょう 】is the noun meaning "studies", and by slapping します on the end, we get the verb 勉強します meaning "to study" or literally "to do (one's) studies". In this case "do" makes sense in English, but this is not always true in all the cases します is used in. For example, パーティー is the noun meaning "party", and パーティーします is the verb meaning "to have a party". Here, "to do a party" doesn't really work in English, so we translate します as "to have" instead.

There are many, many other verbs which are created this way (adding します after a noun), and even though します means "to do", it's largely up to the translator to decide whether "do {noun}" makes sense in English or not. There are also a number of different irregular usages of します where it can mean things like "to decide on", "to be sensed (of a smell, flavor, noise, etc)", "to wear (a facial expression)", etc.

あります: generally means "to be" or "to exist" for inanimate objects, which commonly makes it the equivalent of "there is ~".

However, because of the grammatical logic behind the particles は and が, あります is also frequently used to show possession, i.e. "to have". The way this works is that は indicates the topic of the conversation, or "the thing we are talking about", and が indicates the subject, or "the thing that is doing the verb". For example, 私【わたし】は仕事【しごと】があります means "when it comes to me (=私は), work (=仕事) is a thing that (=が) exists (=あります)", or in more normal English: "I have work".

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielKlei4

Do I really have to use あなた? If I am talking to the person I don't need to specify it, right?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

You don't really have to use it. If you're talking to and about the person (that is, the context doesn't suggest you might be talking about someone else), then you don't need to specify it.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gui253827
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Sams here. Could ommit the "wo" particle without

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brian_Jean

masu ka vs shimasu ka?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HaruhiSuzu6

Hmmm. Left out the を and it was accepted. 11/21/2018

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JKSot
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Difference between しごとをきます and はたらきます?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zueilen

I know is' most likely to be wrong if I say this, but why? しごとはいつしますか

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ka_HU
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Can't I say it like this?

しごとはいつしますか

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaggieB313714

There is only one "shi" offered in the selection to put the above sentence together. Duolingo says there are two in the answer.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WouterVerhelst

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1 year ago
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