"I am a college student."

Translation:大学生です。

August 4, 2017

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/OneViGOR

Unless I'm mistaken there's no distinction between the characters that define university and college. Are these interchangeable? I know this is an American app and I'm not 100% sure how it is there, but I'm from England where universities and colleges are different things entirely.

August 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuffsStuff

In American English, college and university are pretty much interchangeable. They both refer to education immediately after high school.

August 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/TyWilliams18

They aren't entirely synonymous - college can be used for any post primary education institution but typically refers to 2-4 year institutions, however university only refers to 4+ year institutions where one can receive a master's or doctorate's.

September 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Isaac_Luna_
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"College" is how you refer to post-secondary education in general in American English. For instance, you wouldn't say "I'm going to university next year", you would always say "I'm going to college". Specific institutions that offer post-secondary education may either be Universities or colleges of some type.

December 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ajcrwl
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Previously I've seen 大学 specifically being translated as "university" and 高校 as "college" within this same course. This is also how I was taught by a teacher. I guess, that's how it should be. I'm not American btw. So I've no idea what's up with this translation. Came here with the same question.

November 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/euph365
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In American vernacular, college and university are interchangeable. They both refer to any formal post-secondary degree-granting education.

Americans typically graduate from high-school at age 18. This completes American secondary education and awards a high school diploma. At this point, students can apply to a university/college to continue education toward a degree. The title university or college mostly just depends on the title of the particular institution. For instance Harvard University, Dartmouth College and Massachusetts Institute of Technology are all what would be called universities in the UK. There is no case of a lower school being called a college in the US.

The fact that they are degree-granting is important: any sort of institution/program which only grants certifications would be more likely to be referred to as a technical school.

In everyday speech, most Americans would say "I am a college student/I go to college" instead of "I am a university student/I go to university". They both would be understood to mean the same thing, but "college" is the more natural word in American English.

November 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/entelexia

It can be used at times interchangeably but that isn't always tje case. I always thought of University being more prestigious like Brown University or Yale University compared to Insert Unknown City or Town College.

March 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/DMazn
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大学生 ですvs 大学生たちです? what is the difference?

January 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Sum_Gai

たち would specify plural, so could translate to, "We are university/college students."

January 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/AxonPrism

たち makes student pleural.

January 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/AdomasDask

so what does 生 do?

February 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/RVJioWts

In this case, it means "student [of the previous type of school]". So for example, 大学 is college and 大学生 is college student. 高校 is high school and 高校生 is high school student, etc.

February 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/jamesjiao
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Duo has to be carefully with the use of certain words like 'college'. It doesn't always mean a tertiary institution in countries outside the USA>

January 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/HenryWrigh5

does this mean college in the American sense? If so, how would I say I'm a college student in the english sense? Cheers

March 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Mimi10042

Im American. And you can also have colleges within Universities. So for example, there is the Truslake Business College within the University of Missouri. And there is a College of Arts and Science, etc. On all forms you fill out for the university you are asked to specify both the college (for me it was Arts and Science) and your major (psychology). So its like majors nested within colleges which are nested within universities. And each college has its own dean (so the Dean of Arts and Science) and other administrative and governing boards. And they are all under the umbrella of the U of Missouri system. Its confusing. The simplest is just to know college = univeristy. The only time i would say its not interchangeable is in the case of “Community Colleges” in which someone would not say they are attending a university

December 30, 2018
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