"Lei lascia il ragazzo."

Translation:She leaves the boy.

March 8, 2013

78 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NakajimaMegami

That was adorable and it made me laugh because I think a little Italian mouse said this in Tom and Jerry, lingot for you!! :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EspaTalia

Io prendo il ragazzo. Il ragazzo é mio.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin968039

Such a good mom :-/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThinkerXT

Or maybe povera lei, if that would be after he said "Leave me alone!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LoicCoenen

Or maybe she leaves because he's an ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hector290697

Let me guess. "Poor boy/kid/thing" in the right context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Biochemistry

I would think "she leaves the boy behind" would be valid, or perhaps "she leaves behind the boy?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TobyBartels

Yes, it seems to me that the word "behind" clarifies a simple literal meaning in English (just leaving him behind, not leaving him forever). However, given that Duolingo offers "boyfriend" as an alternative to "boy behind", perhaps this simple meaning is not what the Italian implies?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mmseiple

In Italian it could mean either. "Lasciare" is the verb used for breaking up with someone. It has the same ambiguity as "leave" in English, though if I saw the sentence "Lei lascia il ragazzo" without any other context, I would probably assume it was a girl breaking up with her boyfriend. I'm not 100% sold on translating it as "leave behind," though. That might work for "lasciare" if you were talking about forgetting your keys at home, but for talking about leaving a person behind and moving on, I would use "lasciare indietro," especially if talking figuratively. Maybe a native speaker can shed more light on this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ksoo

"She leaves behind the boy" is, according to Duo, not correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asharadel

You could try 'She leaves the boy behind', maybe? 'She leaves behind the boy' sounds a bit like she's at a party and desperately trying not to be spotted by an embarrassing ex or something and she uses the cover of some poor guy's back to depart.

When you say 'She leaves the boy behind' it has the more traditional meaning of leaving without said boy, either physically or on the road we call live.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cucucumber

That is still incorrect, according to Duolingo :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WolkZayets

Even though "leave (behind)" is at the top of the hint list.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jar23pma30

According to Duo, one definition for "lascia" is "leave behind" Check the original word definition.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ksoo

I know; I was really upset when it got counted incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MAMIPILY

I feel for you. FREE LINGOT!!!!!!!!!!! =0D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scostumatu

story of my life.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheBoneB

i feel ya bro... complementary lingot....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arbor92

and takes the cannoli...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Egdir

Why she had to go, I don't know, she wouldn't say...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Queso17

Ieri, tutti i miei problemi sembravano allontanarsi ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Egdir

Ora sembra che siano qui per restare...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WolkZayets

O, io credo nel passato


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/imogenwil

I said something wrong, now I long for yesterday...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrSunshine251

Call me crazy, but isn't the literal translation "She leaves the boy behind"? Also, up to this point, we've never had any indication that "ragazzo" also means "boyfriend"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rgiar

Ragazzo typically does mean boyfriend. Without other indications this is the likeliest interpretation. However, if it was "Lei lascia il suo ragazzo." it would be without a shadow of doubt about a boyfriend. Il ragazzo could be the boy mentioned previously, or the lad, or the guy. There is some age limit to being a ragazzo but it's pretty vague.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ewwwitssteph

I thought fidanzato was boyfriend...??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RedheadedRogue

It can be, but I believe "fidanzato" implies a little more commitment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrSunshine251

Thanks for the reply and clarification, Rgiar!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bigant_underdog

The literally translation is "She (lei) Leaves (lascia) The (il) Boy (ragazzo). The word "Behind" would be another word in the sentence vhanging it into the one you were saying. But "She leaves the boy" is the literal translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/almarioboter

how will i know if the verb "lasciare" is being used as "to leave" or "to let"? it has the same context as the verb "laisser" in french which have the same meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Clawja2

Haha was going to see if I had misunderstood something but I see that people have been ranting about this for a while. I take comfort in knowing that many people tried to leave the boy behind


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nioc98

This could also mean "She lets the boy go" although it is not permitted as a translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThatsBaloney

I also thought it could be, "She lets the boy go." Hmmmmmmmmm...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobinHensens

I would personally think "letting go" means something else than "leaving behind". Letting go is more physical (letting go of something you're holding in your hand). But I'm not sure!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MADasALICE

May I direct you to a little Disney song, you may have heard it a few thousand time by now, it's called "let it go" and it speaks of not only a physical release but a metaphorical release. Totally valid. You can "let go" of a past relationship or "let go" of emotions, not just things you can physically hold.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mskycc3

Yes, but "let go" tends to imply allowing something or someone to leave (that would leave on its own as long as you don't stop it from leaving, physically or metaphorically).

"Leave" implies the subject is the one actively doing the leaving, perhaps even without the consent of the other person or thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WolkZayets

Like that old Engelbert Humperdink song, "Please release me, let me go, for I don't love you anymore..."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TobyBartels

According to Duolingo, this sentence didn't mean "leaving behind" anyway.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pablosch61

Lasciare andare would be to let go.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lupocuore77

It is probably quite sad that I had to mentally sing Andrea Bocelli's Romanza in my head so I didn't scroll over the word "lascia." But I am now quite sad; it's a sad song. "Lentamente mi lascia" = "slowly she leaves me" according to the translation I was watching, so that's how I knew. Still so, so, so sad.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NakajimaMegami

Anything to help you remember, you know? That's actually a pretty smart thing you did, you relied on your mental reserve before peeking which helps you retain information better. In fact, while the song's sad, it'll pop up to remind you what "lascia" and what not means.

I had to sing Toto Cotugno's L'Italiano just to remember what "lascia" means.

LASCIATEMI CANTARE!~ PERCHE' NE SONO FIERO! SONO ITALIANO...

Italiano vero!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lupocuore77

I started listening to Andrea Bocelli before I ever started on Duolingo (which was like four days ago); I just didn't expect to learn much about what he was actually saying enough for it to stick XD But music is such a wonderful way to learn, no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartnRoque

Lascia is not "leave behind" it's just leave or let like in "Leave me alone" or "Let me go"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caterinabella

Maybe she's not cruel - maybe she's "leaving" the boy at his school.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Punkmom

I'm trying to understand what kind of context this belongs in. Would it be like, "she leaves the boy with his grandparents while she goes shopping" or like "she leaves her boyfriend because she couldn't stand him even one day longer"?

Italian speakers, can you help? Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/katiat

I am not native in Italian but lived in Italy and my understanding that ragazzo is typically a boyfriend without other context. Of course under some circumstances it could be just a boy. If you overhear a street conversation chances are they are talking about her boyfriend being dumped.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Punkmom

Cool. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mskycc3

But with context, it could easily be like "She leaves the boy with his grandparents while she goes shopping."??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WolkZayets

Yes, context is everything when trying to translate sentences like this :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EspaTalia

And inadvertently inspired an album of Taylor Swift songs, released circa 2015


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elena18

Could this also mean "she neglects the boy" or "she leaves the boy alone" (in both senses- as in "she's not bothering him" and "she leaves him by himself without anyone else there"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marziotta

I wouldn't say so. Neglect "Lei trascura il ragazzo" "Lei ignora il ragazzo"

Alone "Lei lascia il ragazzo da solo" But maybe in this case "Lei lascia il ragazzo" could work in some contexts, I cannot think of any now anyway.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ticklewulf

My mind connected this to lacerate and i thought she cut him for a sec


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crimsonros2

una storia triste :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sylviamora

And got herself un uomo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magideath-

Good on her. Let her find a nice ragazzi instead.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/katiat

I think "she leaves the guy" is valid.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wafalasco

Laura non c'è, e' andata via


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArinAkpina

I said "she lets go of the boy"and it was accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/humanwatch

I still feel 'let go' as if a parent is holding a child's hand, is also possible meaning. When I was little our nanny would always tell us to leave things alone, saying "lascia!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ottavio618374

"She leaves the boyfriend" seems a better context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/simonderijk

She lets the boy go. Not good....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WolkZayets

I think this actually means that she is leaving her boyfriend.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/0qnJTezk

it didn't allow me time to say the phrase


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SofieJones798

She leaves the boy or she leaves her boyfriend?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/H.G.Stolk27

No! Now I'm sad.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElroyMan

DUOLINGO IS WEAVING A HECK OF A TALE WITH THESE PROMPTS


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanCohe208206

Since there is no context for this short sentence perhaps adding "heartbroken" would have helped, if that was the sense meant to be conveyed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelSal309340

Why isn't there gender agreement between the verb "leaves" and the object of sentence "boy." In other words why is lascio il ragazzo wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Punkmom

Verbs are conjugated to indicate the subject of the verb (I, you, he/she/it, we, you, they) not the object. In this case, "Lei" is the subject of the verb (third person singular) and the matching form of the verb is lascia.

"Lascio" would mean "I leave."

Verbs do not have gender agreement. Adjectives and third-person singular pronouns agree in gender (and number) with the nouns that they modify or stand for.

https://www.thoughtco.com/italian-verbs-lasciare-conjugations-4097386


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nicolas278908

Now I feel sad for him :(

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