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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mina42192

qui habite à New York vs. Habitant à New York Whats the difference?

qui habite à New York vs. Habitant à New York

whats the difference between these two??

What is Habitant? Its not a conjucation of Habiter? Does it mean an inhabitant and so do they translate as:

Qui habite à New York- Who lives in New York Habitant à New York- An inhabitant of New York

??

Thank you very much !

August 7, 2017

3 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/relox84

habitant is the present participle of habiter: present participle more or less corresponds to the English verb ending -ing.

Un homme qui habite à New York = A man who lives in New York

Un homme habitant à New York = A man living in New York

Note that present participles do not agree in gender/number.

All French verbs have a present participle, but some of them evolved into nouns of their own, which is the case for "un habitant" which means a resident:

Un habitant de New York = A resident of New York


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mina42192

Ohh right! of course! completely forgot about the present participle for a second.

Thank you!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arren01

In your example, the word « habitant » is the present participle of the verb « habiter ». But, « habitant » as a noun mean « inhabitant ».

« [...] qui habite à New York » and « [...] habitant à New York » mean exactly the same thing. However, the second form is more formal.

[qui + verbe au présent] = [verbe conjugated to the participle present], always.

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