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  5. "I got married in June."

"I got married in June."

Translation:六月に結婚しました。

August 7, 2017

16 Comments


[deactivated user]

    Why is に needed in this sentence while it isnt needed for 去年けっこんしました?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/testmoogle

    Why in English is the preposition "in" needed for "I got married in June" but not for "I got married in last year" ? ^^


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kurros

    I don't know, but maybe there is a fancy grammatical reason? Especially since it happens in both English and Japanese, makes me think there is some universal grammar magic behind it!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gyJe7QcR

    The grammatical reason is, that に is optional for some or must never be used with most RELATIVE time words.

    June is not relative to any other time. It marks a concrete point in time.

    Tomorrow is a relative time word, marking a time that's relative to today.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roy_destroy2

    Oh, I guess that makes sense


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arcferrari248

    PLAIN FORM: 「6月に結婚した.」 POLITE FORM: 「6月に結婚しました.」


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Siroggak

    So what's that first "shi" is about? The first one is a conjugated past form of "masu", right? What about the one that preceds "mashi"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/testmoogle

    Your post is extremely confusing the way it's currently worded. ^^;

    けっこん is a noun meaning "marriage".

    Some nouns can be used as verbs by adding the verb する as a suffix.

    The past form of する is した. And for the ~ます version of する (which is します), the past form is しました (the past form of ~ます is ~ました).

    • けっこん = "marriage" (noun)
    • けっこんする = "marry" (verb, plain form, non-past)
    • けっこんした = "married" (verb, plain form, past)
    • けっこんします = "marry" (verb, polite ~ます form, non-past)
    • けっこんしました = "married" (verb, polite ~ます form, past)

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saliast

    That makes an amazing amount of sense to me. Thank you!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saliast

    How can you tell which nouns will work like this and which won't? Is there a way.. Short of simply having to memorize them one by one? Will this work in reverse as well with -koto added to certain verbs to change them into nouns?
    Also... Is this suru the same as "to do"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MotYLi2

    I can't tell if it's an absolute rule because we were sort of talking about something else so we didn't get into the details but my Japanese teacher said the "noun+suru" trick works for most nouns that can be written with two kanji (yeah, i know, I'm terrible at kanji too...). She also said that if we use it on a noun that usually doesn't work that way, Japanese people would still understand what you're trying to say. Hope it helps!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mik.santoro

    Why is it 六月に?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/knatt

    六 = 6; 月 = month; に = in. In the sixth month -> In June.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Edzsike

    I love these new "hard exercises".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbsentWork

    Why is に right but には is wrong?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShesTwoTents

    I'm so confused - I don't remember learning any of these new words, let alone the sentence structures. This is the 3rd one in a row =(

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