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  5. "山にのぼって、それから川に行きます。"

"山にのぼって、それから川に行きます。"

Translation:I will climb the mountain, then go to the river.

August 8, 2017

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/azureviolin

山に登って、それから川に行きます。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaredTafoya

That's a helluva triathlon . . .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NigelRedpa1

Come on それから should be trabslatable as "after that"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mccaaww

I thought this would translate more as "I am climbing the mountain, then i will go to the river." because it uses って ??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

A sequence of て-form verbs (ending in some other verb form, such as simple past or non-past) is used to describe a chronological sequence of events.

Examples of that and other ways to connect verb sequences here: http://www.guidetojapanese.org/learn/complete/verb_sequences


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LISA881075

てdoesn't mean doing right now. If it was ~っている then it means doing something right now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joe598286

whenever its phrased this way (like in the old i will clean then do the laundry part) I just asume the first verb is in the same tense as the second verb, I dont know if this is correct, but it seems to work so far


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SevenAmber77

but I get incorrect


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/animatrix1490

My understanding is that "それから" is me up of two parts, where それ is like "that" and から is like "following". Am I anywhere close?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

それから literally means "after that". When translating the whole thing into a single English sentence, we usually use "(and) then" to avoid creating a run-on sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rk5I3

Something like that, yes. Xから is 'from X (on)', so simply put it's 'after that' or 'then.'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raijania

それから seems unnecessary here, doesn't te form imply it already?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

I think the use of それから emphasizes the sequential order of the events.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/steve817862

It's not unnecessary, but I'm sick of seeing it. Japanese people, like all people, prefer shorter, more succinct ways to state something. Most people would just say 山にのぼってから、川に行きます。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eli-aiki

Rejected: "I will climb the mountain, and after that go to the river." What could be a more direct translation of それから?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zeid89

so i've done ""i'm going to climb a mountain, then i'll go to the river"", it said that my translation is wrong and the correct translation is ""I'm going to climb a mountain, then i'm gonna the river."" .

Reported :<


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SirJacqi

There is nothing incorrect about repeating the pronoun in the second part - "I will climb the mountaing, then I'll go to the river". And since I chose to use "we" (equally correct), not using it again sounds weird.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sharad315449

After climbing the moutain, i will go to the river. Anyone?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/animatrix1490

Climb every mountain Ford every stream Follow every rainbow 'Til you find your dream


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Allamarth

But rivers are in valleys...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eli-aiki

Should accept: "Having climbed the mountain, I'll go to the river."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PukkaEllingworth

what is the の doing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeroen329932

It's part of the verb: to climb

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