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"¿Quién decidió esto?"

Translation:Who decided this?

5 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/puppychair123

Is she supposed to sound like she has an attitude, or is it just me?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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Someone's in trouble, that's all I know.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

She sounds innocently inquisitive to me, but the sentence definitely sounds like there's a storm a-brewin'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tangochica

thats exactly what I thought-quiet and dangerous at the same time... a tone that takes years of cultivation...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/manoelhc
manoelhc
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Why not "who did decide this?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/King2E4
King2E4
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"Who did decide this?" is only used for emphasis. Normally, a person would ask "who decided this?".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fayever
Fayever
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"who did decide this" - I don't think I have ever heard in the states. He/she/it did decide, or (noun) did decide, but i don't think who did decide this would ever be spoken by a native English speaker from the US.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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Actually it's not an uncommon thing to say in a Bureaucratic situation. While the auxiliary verb do is a fundamental part of any question without an interrogative pronoun and most negative statements, do is also introduced as an emphatic element. In a question it would be sort of an impatient element. Scenario::

You go into work and every one is gearing up to start a big project. You are surprised because, although the project had been discussed for weeks, your manager had told you that it wasn't going to work so he was not going to approve it. You say this to a colleague who tells you the manager is still against it. So you ask him Who did decide this? In other words it is shorthand for if the manager did not decide this, who did decide it.

But whether this added emphasis wouldn't also be reflected in the Spanish is a separate question. Spanish does use both an emphatic sí or ya in some sentences. I am not sure if either of those would have the same effect.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BulbousRumpus

Mm whacha say. Ooo that it's just what we need.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kabboca
kabboca
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Came here looking for this :) and ransom notes keep falling out your mouth...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BulbousRumpus

Woo! I was hoping wouldn't be the only one who thought of that song.

<3 Imogen Heap

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcioalbe

Why no who did decide that?

4 years ago