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https://www.duolingo.com/Dave754769

Does it help you to write things down?

A lot of the material I read in the welsh course does not stick in my memory, the written explanatory notes and tips below.

Does it help you to have a notebook [pen and pencil and paper] and write these things down?

Or do you solely use the PC?

Thankyou.

1 year ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DestartreK1st
DestartreK1st
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I think you should write word (or tips and notes) in a notebook.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sara583857

When it comes to dialects, I make sure to write the difficult parts down in a notebook. I use the app, as well as my laptop. Something that could possibly help you remember is to "think" in the language you want to learn. Let's say you're thirsty and want to drink coffee... try to translate it from your native language to the language you want to learn.

Example (English --> Welsh):

"I want to drink coffee" --> "Dw i eisiau yfed coffi"

Simply reading and writing in the language will not benefit you as much as exposing yourself to the language. Try to think in Welsh as much as possible. It will challenge you (in a good way)!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dave754769

Thankyou [everyone] Some good ideas which I will put into practice. Diolch.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IanGordon12

Something I do (partly a side-effect of my being borderline OCD) is to try to translate titles and lines from songs and books into Welsh. For example, one of my favourite Meatloaf songs contains the following line in its chorus - Baswn i'n gwneud unrhyw am caru, ond wna i ddim hwnna (if I've translated it right).

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joe733089
Joe733089
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Sometimes it does help to write it down. Cymraeg ""Welsh language'' like all Celtic languages have a specific structure to them. That is a little different than other languages. Once you get the structure down it become easy. To me it goes along the thought process. One it got used to it unlike other languages the advance part came smoothly. But that might just be me. Yes writing it down will help your brain alline your memory. The more you engage in any language the more natural it becomes. We are designed to adapt for survival so makes sense. Gl on you Journey Dymunaf chi ffrind llwyddiant

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Beau861

For me personally, I've always believed that writing out words and sentences in the target language to some degree helps a lot. In practice though, I do so much typing on duolingo that I feel it covers that form of practice, and the thought of putting pen to paper sounds daunting and kind of pointless. Taking grammar notes seems like a good idea. I've started going through the "tips and notes" section here on duolingo and making bullet points for each section. Though even this I find hard to get myself to do; I'm over half way through the Welsh tree and have only done bullet points for the first 8 skills, lol!

Speaking of the "tips and notes" section here on duolingo, and this is only my experience with them, but I usually don't even look at them until completing the skill and even then not until after refreshing it several times. I know everyone goes on about how important they are and how you should go over them before even doing the lessons of that skill, but back when I was still trying that way I always felt discouraged because reading notes about a new aspect of the language just didn't click any useful knowledge in my brain. It just works for me better to do the lessons cold, let my brain assimilate the words and sentence structures through the translations, and after plenty of practice THEN go over the notes to flesh out any helpful details. The notes have MUCH more relevancy once I'm familiar with the skills.

That's just what works for me, though, and the important thing is to do whatever works for you. My way may not work for some, but whatever method you're following, if you're struggling don't hesitate to shake things up and find the way that gets you to success.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dave754769

I can relate to that Beau. My brain seems to work in the same way. I've got to level 8 but now need to do other things, like learning the alphabet for starters i think. Like you the notes are more relevant afterwards.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sandie826177

I practice a lot online but I also find that for my learning style I need do write stuff down, too. The vocabulary in duolingo is very disorganised so I need to write that down because sometimes they use new words which aren't in the list for the unit - e.g. clothes. Also - some of the sentences are a bit random (I want 36 oranges...) so like to think of real life sentences. Like the bite size pieces, which is a very successful method. Most courses cram far too much into one lesson so people drop out (Cwrs Mynediad, etc). Dw i'n hoffi Duolingo!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TerryWoods

I never learn without a notepad at my side! I often write the phrase, word in a main notebook then rewrite it many times whilst rehearsing aloud to make it stick.

11 months ago