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"¿Quién es aquella persona?"

Translation:Who is that person?

2
5 years ago

61 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/agambrahma

So ... aquella is like esa, but for stuff that's further away ?

111
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itwing
itwing
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In Spanish we have three distances. For something nearby esta,estas,este,estos,esto, something far away, esa,esas,ese,esos,eso. And for something further aquella,aquellas,aquel,aquellos,aquello.

Like you only have this and that, normally you translate aquel... like that.

347
Reply143 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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What is the difference between the English and the Spanish demonstratives?

In English we used:

• “this” to talk about what is near the speaker.

• “that” to talk about what is far from the speaker.

But in Spanish we have three “semantic fields”, three differences:

• “este” to talk about what is near the speaker.

• “ese” to talk about what is near the listener.

• “aquel” to talk about what is far from both, speaker and listener.

By the way, it is the same difference about "here and there" and "aqui, ahí and allí or allá"

9
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Benzy911
Benzy911
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Good info

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LostSparrow

OK so.... my spanish is "aquel sueno"?

4
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aljoja
Aljoja
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Yes, this sentence means who is that person (over there), across the room from you as opposed to being near to you. It's tricky at first. Hope that clears it up.

122
Reply24 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
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In Italy (or at least Naples) they use the chin to gesture towards a direction, as in "over there". It's like pointing but without the finger. I don't know if they do something similar in Spanish speaking countries.

7
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/theguy07

they do that in a lt of places, and buddy, u get a lingo for your exp number

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniellij

My friend is Filipino and studied in Spain, so I am not sure which influence it is, but he points with his LIPS.

0
Reply5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thefifthjudge
thefifthjudge
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I was taught that "eso" and "esa" are for something far from the speaker but near to the person spoken to, while "aquella" and "aquello" are for something far from both the speaker and the person spoken to.

86
Reply43 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/khmatnazarov
khmatnazarov
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That's right!

7
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElliottofRivia

Aquel is like saying "da drüben" in German. "That __ over there."

1
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HerrLoewe

Wanna know a strange coincidence? Spanish and Japanese are identical with their this vs. that vs. that over there distinction.

これ koré = esto = this = (close to speaker)
それ soré = eso = that = (close to listener, far from speaker)
あれ aré = aquello = that = (far from speaker and listener)

And then, just like Spanish, Japan distinguishes between determiners used as a pronoun (This is bad. - I love that) or as an adjective (This dog is bad. - I love that dog.)

Pronoun: これ(koré)、それ(soré)、あれ(aré) = esto, eso, aquello
Adjective: この(kono)、その(sono)、あの(ano) = este (-os, -a, -as), ese (-os, -a, -as), aquel (-os, -a, -as)

The only difference is that Spanish only uses the special neuter pronoun forms when the gender of the item is unknown (¿Qué es eso?) whereas Japanese uses them any time the word is a pronoun.

::edit:: The acute accent ´ is not typically used in Japanese transcription, but I added it as a pronunciation aid. It does not indicate stress (Japanese doesn't use a stress accent), but rather that the e is not silent. I did this to prevent the Japanese words koré, soré, and aré from being mispronounced as the English words core, sore, and are. The same convention can be seen occasionally with the word saké, (vs. English "sake") and always with the word Pokémon (vs. English "poke").

19
Reply23 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElpisIsrael

How should the different Spanish letters with accents be pronounced? Nowhere on this website have I found a guide.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HerrLoewe

I wrote out a really complicated example and then I found this. You should read that instead. Let me know if it doesn't help.

Edit:
I took this directly from the "Tips and notes" section of Basics 1. I wonder if you might have missed it:

Accent Marks

Vowels in Spanish can have an accent mark, such as the "u" in "menú" (menu). One use of the accent mark is to indicate which syllable should be stressed in the pronunciation. For example, in "teléfono" (telephone), the second "e" has the most stress.

Accent marks are also used to distinguish homophones. For example, "él" and "el" are homophones because they have the same pronunciation. However, "él" is a masculine pronoun (meaning "he" or "him") and "el" is a masculine article (meaning "the").

12
Reply32 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElpisIsrael

So they do not actually make a difference to the sound of the letter, like a German Umlaut?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HerrLoewe

Short answer: The acute accent ( ´ ) only indicates stress or distinguished homophones. The diaresis ( ¨ ) indicates a non-silent u.

Long answer: Sound quality? No. Only stress. There are only 5 vowel sounds in standard Spanish. /a/, /e/, /i/, /o/, and /u/ (possibly also /ɛ/ depending on the speaker).

The diaresis¹ (found only on ü) is used in special cases to show that the u is pronounced as /w/ rather than the expected silent vowel in the combinations gue or gui. For example, the word pingüino requires the diaresis for proper pronunciation: /pinˈgwi.no/. Without it, the u would be silent: /pinˈgino/.

gui = /gi/ (guitarra) /giˈtara/
güi = /gwi/ (pingüino) /pinˈgwino/

gue = /ge/ (guerra) /ˈgera/
güe = /gwe/ (bilingüe) /biˈlingwe/

If there were no u or ü in the combinations above, the g would sound like /h/~/ç/~/x/ (Either h as in "happy," "human," or the ch in Scottish loch).

If you see gua, or guo, those u's are always pronounced /w/.

You can read more about that here.

¹Note that the ¨ is a diaresis and not an umlaut. The word umlaut refers only to the German(ic) usage of the ¨ to indicate a sound change.

edit: Formatting

13
Reply112 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElpisIsrael

Thanks.

1
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Benzy911
Benzy911
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Good job.

1
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Benzy911
Benzy911
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Similar to arabic also.

1
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kameliajam

I wanted to thank you so much for such a usefull information. Really appreciate it ;)

0
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Si_Robertson

Oh geez aquella, I have a feeling i'm gona have some trouble with you

15
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ethanjanssen

I know right?

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Obedgilles
Obedgilles
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:)

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SageTX

Aquella = over yonder, in the South (part of the U.S.)

10
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HowardWigg

I wish "yonder" would come back in style for the rest of the English speaking world. It is extremely useful. I say it all the time.

0
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jodytinsley

I tried "Who is yonder person?" and got it marked wrong. I know this is an old-fashioned/dialectical English form, but I think correct in this application, as SageTX writes below.

5
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/boutrose

Wouldn't "yonder" or "yon" also work? They're archaic, but English used to make the distinction.

3
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HowardWigg

Ha ha. It's not archaic in the Southern United States! I use "yonder" all the time. It's a very useful word.

0
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piperTom

"Who is yonder person?" Quaint maybe, but should be accepted

3
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shemp
shemp
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Could we also use eso, or esa?

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

'Persona" is always feminine. 'esta persona' = this person, 'esa persona' = that person, and 'aquella persona' = that person over there "eso" is neuter

34
Reply15 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeevikaa_nan
Jeevikaa_nan
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Nouns in spanish are differentiated with genders. Generally we use this, that, those,these with nouns. Than how could one use 'eso', neuter one.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

¿Qué es eso? (What is that?) Queremos esto/eso/estos/esos. (We want this/that/these/those.) No puedo comprender esto/eso/estos/esos. (I can't understand this/that/these/those.)

8
Reply42 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnSimone2

Thanks. Very helpful.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jazzy.R.L

IT'S JOHN CENA

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jae_woods

xD lol

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ayePete
ayePete
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How come they give "Who is that person over there" as a possible answer? Is the "over there" supposed to be a literal translation?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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It's not a literal translation in my opinion, who is that person over there? Would be translated to «¿Quíen es esa/aquella persona de allá?». I think Duo is a bit confused about the meaning of aquella. We normally use aquella to refer to objects that are far, but in reality it means the object is at the same distance from the speaker and the listener, and that doesn't mean the object is far away.

12
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ayePete
ayePete
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Gracias

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatrickBai1

I read this in a comment on another question: apparently the difference between "eso" and "aquel" is that the former implies the thing is closer in proximity and the latter implies it is further in proximity. Hence, "Who is that person over there?" is a little more accurate.

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElpisIsrael

Should not "Who is that person there?" be accepted?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bexsentico

I put who is that person and got it right

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/atntony
atntony
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Why do we have to add "over there?" Would it not mean the same if you said "who is that person?"

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spiralx

See previous discussion.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tango100

Yes, I agree wouldn't "over there" be implied?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amyhengst

"La persona" does that imply it is necessarily a woman? or could it be a male person? All other uses seem to default to men which includes women...

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/samoconnor

this is so confusing

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheGreatAce

So the "over there" isn't actually a word. It is just assumed to go with the sentence. It should be "¿Quién es esa persona allí ?"

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jimins_lost_jams

how is it possible to have "over there?" when there is not enough letters??? im very confused

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyJayn21

It's me, obviously.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lolly_bear

Why can't you just say who is that? That implies that there is a person present right?

0
Reply1 year ago