https://www.duolingo.com/RonBurns3

Is this course based upon Latin American Spanish?

Is this course based upon Latin American Spanish?

August 12, 2017

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Woof.

Yes. But anyone who speaks Spanish will understand you as long as you are speaking Spanish and not Dutch.

August 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/pentaan

Yes, it is.

On Duolingo, you'll learn a version of Spanish closer to what you'd hear in Latin America than in Spain, but the differences are relatively small and everybody will be able to understand you.
Source: https://www.duolingo.com/course/es/en/Learn-Spanish-Online

For more information, read the comment of arismartin in this discussion
https://www.duolingo.com/comment/1970354

August 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/-.Edwin.-

I have seen in this site a lot of native-English learners understandly concerned about if they are learning Spain's Spanish or Latin America's Spanish.

As a native Spanish speaker I can say you that is not important at all the slight differences in pronunciation ('grass-ias' instead of 'gratfhias') or use of "vosotros" or "ustedes" or the use of different words for calling a thing (patata or papa).

There are regional variations, as in any language, but no country (even Spain) can abrogate itself the right to say "my Spanish is the best". Exactly as no English-speaker country can say "My English is superior".

Variation enriches a language. It doesn't attack its integrity. The real language's killers are those people who do not make adequate use of the Spanish's grammar, syntax and phonetics. And there are of these people enough in both Spain and Latin America. I guess that the same claim can be said about any other language.

August 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RonBurns3

Thank you for the best clarification of my question as it was well stated. I guess my desire is to enjoy the people and culture of my dreamed of final destination. I don't want to be just another "gringo", I want to enjoy and absorb everyone and everything around me. Pura Vida as they say in Costa Rica.

August 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/-.Edwin.-

I think that you will spend a really nice time in Costa Rica. I had the chance of visiting that country and it is a really beautiful place! And ticos are a very kind people. Pura Vida for you too!

August 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RonBurns3

I spend about two to three hours per day, "cada día" studying, primarily on Mango, however, I just discovered duolingo and find it a refreshing addition. My greatest obstacle at this time is not having someone to talk to in Spanish. Immersion in a Spanish speaking venue is what I need most at this time to become more fluent and more confidant. Your comments have been very appreciated.

August 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Chilotin

Sort of. It is based mainly on Mexican Spanish with concessions to other Latin American dialects. There is no Latin American Spanish, but 7 or 8 main dialects (Mexican, Central American, Caribbean, Andean, [Colombian Highlands?], Paraguayan, Rioplatense and Chilean).
Read the excellent Alcman's answer, it explains why it doesn't matter.

August 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RonBurns3

Thank for your response. I did read Alcman's comment which was an excellent answer. Thanks again.

August 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RonBurns3

Pentaan, thank you. I am hoping to retire to Costa Rica and am also studying Latin American Spanish through Mango language courses. This is just a bit different and automatically assumes that you are aware of verb tenses and doesn't differentiate between formal and informal words or phrases.

August 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Chilotin

In such case, you should learn voseo, not taught in Duolingo (since in Mexico it is only used in Chiapas and Tabasco by few people) but very important in Costa Rica and the rest of Central America.

August 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RonBurns3

¿Voseo? Is this the Costa Rican informal word for you versus "tú"?

August 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Chilotin

"Voseo" is using "vos" for informal singular you. Do you already use it? I've heard Costa Ricans don't like "tú" among themselves, because they consider it a foreign usage (it is indeed).

August 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RonBurns3

No. I have learned "tú" for the informal singular form of you. Thank you for the information. I will put it in my vocabulary and I appreciate your input.

August 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Chilotin

You're welcome. It is used with special conjugations, you'll need to recognize them: tú cantas = vos cantás, tú comes = vos comés, tú vives = vos vivís. The good part is these conjugations have no changes in root where "tuteo" forms require a change, so you don't need to learn a new irregular form: dormir -> dormís (not duermes), tener -> tenés (not tienes), colar (to sift) -> colás (not cuelas).

"Tú" is the Spanish cognate of "thou" and "vos" is related to "you", then Spanish from Costa Rica and other countries has followed the same process of mainstream English: a pronoun that it was formerly used for second plural person became a pronoun for second singular person.

I hope you enjoy your Spanish learning and your retirement.

August 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/BonBonChat

Yes but it takes Castilian words that are used. For differences of all the Spanishes , just google it so you're aware

August 13, 2017
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