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  5. "Gehe durch Feuer oder Wasser…

"Gehe durch Feuer oder Wasser."

Translation:Go through fire or water.

March 9, 2013

66 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erikman

Is this the German equivalent of 'through thick and thin?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

“through fire and water” is a common English expression as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16

Yes, I know it means something like:go through extreme difficulties to achieve something. Of course the ger. is "fire OR water" but it still seems the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zchbaniel25

well, also in German the normal thing to say is "Feuer und Wasser"

The "oder" is highly artificial.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ravenfaewitch

The English expression (certainly in British English) would be "through hell and high water" or some variation of the phrase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hypehuman

I've always heard "through Hell or high water" (US Northeast)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erictico

In American English the idiom is also: "through hell and high water."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vindalf

(jemandem) mit Rat und Tat zur Seite zu stehen -- is the German colloquial phrase I've heard of for "to stand with someone through thick and thin" though I'm sure there are others


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucho74

"Geh durch Feuer oder Wasser" is not correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/magicLamp76

It should be.

cannoo.net says that geh and gehe are both correct for imperativ of gehen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
  • 1972

But 5 years later it's still not accepted (in the listening exersise), and there is no possibility of reporting. This needs to be fixed!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aliceisfunny

I also got this wrong. But perhaps we were meant to hear that the speaker says "gehe" and not "geh".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Berchtesgaden

http://conjugator.reverso.net/conjugation-german-verb-gehen.html

they just used the old command form, German is an ever changing language, colloqually and technically through the spelling reforms


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

Correct. Please report it if it's not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mark778020

because you are supposed to write what is said, which is 'gehe', even though your sentence is also correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

If you have the "Listen and write exercise", but other forms such as "translate English to German" also come here. I had the "translate German to English".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeoBlackma3

@Lucho74 "Geh durch Feuer oder Wasser." was accepted for me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kmramna

Reminds me of his "When thou passest through the waters, I will be with thee; and through the rivers, they shall not overflow thee: when thou walkest through the fire, thou shalt not be burned; neither shall the flame kindle upon thee." Isaiah 43:2


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nateVONgreat

Why is it "gehe" and not "geht"? if it is like "you go..."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

German has three ways to say “you”, so there are three corresponding imperative forms for “Go!”: ‘Geh[e] [Du]!’ (familiar singular), ‘Geht [Ihr]!’ (familiar plural), ‘Gehen Sie!’ (formal singular or plural).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarolZaczk

I thought "gehe" was 1st person singular. So against my intuition, I wrote, "I go through fire or water."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vindalf

You were right too, many people leave out the pronouns (ich here) in spoken German. Don't report it though, because on duolingo we are learning "correct" and written German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erikman

'Gehe' is the imperitive form of 'gehen,' used when telling someone to do something.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Geh or Gehe is the imperative form of "gehen" for "du", "Gehen Sie!" also exists and "Geht" for "ihr".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BWolfBurak

Is there any different between geh and gehe?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrankEdger

Hold on, there! How big is the fire? Anything nasty in that water?


[deactivated user]

    The answer is 42!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FreakBeater

    This should be AND, in the English, not OR!

    Someone needs to go through fire and water to correct this!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vindalf

    No "I would go through fire or water for you" is perfectly fine


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FreakBeater

    I've never heard it with OR, and I know I'm nitpicking really- but it just annoys me that my answer is marked as 100% wrong, when I know it isn't.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

    German also prefers "und" rather than "oder", so you must translate the German.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WilliamEis7

    I've never heard a midwestern american say "through fire or water". Perhaps it is my crude Appalachian upbringing, but this is clearly the equivalent of "through Hell or High Water"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoMoreRomance

    @WilliamEis7 Agreed, even in the Northeast it's the same anywhere on the Eastern coast, but we usually say. "Come Hell or High Water." It's getting done.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Complex77

    By the way, this sentence is not a common German expression. You can say "durchs Feuer gehen", which pretty much matches the English "going through fire and water".

    Or you can go "through thick and thin" which would be "durch dick und dünn", with the same meaning in English and German.


    [deactivated user]

      In my language, we say 'go through dead bodies' in the meaning do everything (also illegal) to get what you want. Is it something like that?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

      No, nothing illegal. Just go through hardship for someone.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoMoreRomance

      No it means that I am moving all of my stuff out of my apartment in 1 day no matter how impossible it is just to get in done in 1 day. Not necessarily hardship, but someone that's high strung and bossy and wants things done immediately no matter what even if there's no emergency.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Qai.R

      Is this an idiom?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmeliedAnjou

      Die Zauberflöte by Mozart!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chaterlaine

      Exactly what I was thinking!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoMoreRomance

      Is this like a weird German saying that only Germans understand. Like the English saying "Come Hell or High Water" we will get this done for a super difficult task it's getting done no matter what.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Neil212426

      "Through fire or flood" is a more common idiom...


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/e-nawar

      If it is the imperative form, where is the exclamation mark?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

      It's missing. Duolingo doesn't score punctuation, so punctuation errors tend to slip through.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

      Even in English, the exclamation mark is not always used with the imperative form.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zukunft21

      Ich kann nicht schwimmen, und ich fürchte mich vor Brennen. Is this sentence correct (spelling, grammar)?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SLeason

      I choose YOU, water!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Syfogidas

      I think "fire AND water" should be accepted, since this is not supposed to be taken literally.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JBaer1
      • 1601

      General question about the use of imperative with/without the use of an exclamation point (!). Is it correct to say that in German you can use imperative with or without an exclamation point, but that if you use an exclamation point you should always use imperative?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KiranChapi

      If there is fire in the building and fire eingine comes to off the fire using water. What would anyone prefer to go through. Fire or water, of course water.

      Bad example may be... Hahahaha


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hao192075

      why not "geh durch Feuer oder Wasser"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/greg335711

      Feuer und Wasser kommt nicht zusammen Kann man nicht binden, sind nicht verwandt In Funken versunken steh' ich in Flammen Und bin im Wasser verbrannt


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elardus

      Trying to understand what you are saying but very hard without punctuation!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yokazuna

      DURCH DIE FEUER UND DIE FLAMMEN


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrelE

      The pronunciation sounds almost the same for durch as Deutsch. Is that correct?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lepussaliens

      I wrote exactly what the answer was and it was marked wrong!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Avery_Eubanks

      Who is "gehe" addressing here?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SvenNoob

      Does Duo want to burn me?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lapaix2

      Die Zauberflöte!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adamdaguy

      please, duo, not my kids


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cabal_52

      Hi everyone this is duo. Welcome to ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dbayly

      It's 2019 and Duolingo still doesn't know that thru is a variant of through.

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