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"El reloj no tiene batería."

Translation:The clock does not have a battery.

5 years ago

81 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/TilEulenspiegel

Why is there no article "una" in front of the word "bateria"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/B0bl0blaw

this sentence could be translated in english as 'the clock has no batteries" - technically in english it sounds like a plural when in fact its the singular of the category. Maybe that's what they were aiming for

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bloiber
bloiber
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it's just too bad they don't accept that answer

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Katie7511

Are there any rules for when you have to us articles or not?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kama410

It _does_accept, "The clock has no battery." (03/2017)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarianeTho2

Weird. "The watch does not have battery" was not accepted. (09/07/2017)

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NelioSalle

Yep, same here. Annoying.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mishmobile

You would need to say either, "The watch has no battery" or "The watch does not have a battery."

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wayne692780

How do you tell the difference when "reloj" means both watch and clock?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuliaYesha

There is no word "has" at all. You should choose from offered words.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kama410

Wha...?

What did you suppose, "tiene," meant? S/he, it, has.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/k2rolina
k2rolina
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Probably because of the word tener; somebody posted this somewhere else, you can check it http://spanish.about.com/od/adjectives/a/indefinite.htm

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jm_gariepy

I just want to make sure I got this straight. Because of the nature 'tener', the article isn't necessary. But whenever 'tener' is used in this way, it will always infer singular, yes? In other words, "The clock does not have batteries" is wrong, because that's not what is implied?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

jm-gariepy- To make it simple- you don't use the article when you normally has or use just one at a time.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kama410

This is a really useful link! It really explains a lot more than I was expecting it to. Especially the bit about the catdog.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mebeast1561

Dulingo gave me the wrong answer

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hbeasley1
hbeasley1
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Because in Spanish you are essentially saying "The clock does not have batteries".

If you used the definite article una, you would be saying "The clock does not have ONE battery", which implies that it may have two or three or four, etc.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nileysa1

Exactly

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmiker54
jmiker54
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I would like to know this as well.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FastAttack

With clock and watch being interchangeable, how do you tell the difference? This sentence, for example, could refer to either one. My answer, also correct, was "The watch does not have a battery."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

Hmm? Clocks are too big & heavy to wear on your wrist, in general. Sorry, I couldn't resist. I had a similar issue with "techo" being roof/ceiling. I expect there is a technical vocabulary we are not getting here - probably a good thing.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ClarkWool
ClarkWool
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Joking aside, I have three wall clocks in my house that run off batteries. Would like to know if there's a way to distinguish without context.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoyceA
JoyceA
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I'm not a native speaker so I stand ready to be corrected but I have seen:

reloj de pulsera = wrist watch

reloj de pared = wall clock

Usually the context makes your meaning obvious but the language allows you to be more precise when necessary.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/digodk
digodk
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This is the accurate answer. Same characteristics apply for portuguese!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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I've seen "reloj de péndulo" used = pendulum clock

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GabrielDayot
GabrielDayot
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Everything that gives time is reloj.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TugaDances

Ok, I give you 5 seconds to read my comment. Ahora soy un reloj! ;D

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

fastattack- with no context, Duo accepts normally both

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregIhnen

Here in Venezuela they would never say batería for the battery in a watch for a wall clock. They would say pila. In Spanish a distinction is made between the little batteries that are disposable, and big batteries like what goes in a car. You would never interchange those words. You wouldn't say that the car needs a pila and you wouldn't say that the watch needs a batería. If you said that they would figure out what you mean, like the time a friend of mine at a restaurant asked for an "arepa con hueso" a sandwich with bone instead of "una arepa con queso" a sandwich with cheese. The waiter didn't even flinch or question the order, he just brought a sandwich with cheese.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

I still don't know why una isn't necessary.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattBurnside

My understanding is that the article is often omitted when the direct object is singular and there can really be only one. I'm a bit murky too.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RemyWaarde

It´s kind of normal in Spanish to leave the article away when it's not important to state the number of the noun. For example: tengo coche, tengo perro, el reloj tiene batería.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tlokken

The watch does not have battery.

The (a) should be optional?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/digodk
digodk
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It's more like an option. You could have it in three ways, either by saying 'una', or using the definite article 'la' or yet leaving them aside. Common usage has it with no articles. Think of it as a translation for 'my watch has no batteries', you don't use the article here as well.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adr_p
adr_p
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Isn't it that we just don't use indefinite articles with tener? Of course in case when we have to say e.g.some batteries, we do use them.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/solenoid.android

in thought it was because of the negative

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Heikheik

The clock might also not have a drum kit. ;) Tried it for curiosity and failed. :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Obedgilles
Obedgilles
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:)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bhg0688

la pila means battery too

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/el-Canguro

Bateria is usually for an automotive battery, Pila would make more sense for a watch battery.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alexio_Xela

It might be a local thing, but I would always say the clock has no batteries (plural) or does not have batteries even if only a single battery is in the device.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BendytheInkDemon

Wait. People still have clocks in their houses? Like NOT on their phones!?!?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scarapancea

I am confused. Does the sentence (in Spanish) mean that the clock/watch does not have a physical battery, or that it needs to be charged because the battery is empty (like with a smart watch)?

In the second case, I would translate it to English as 'The clock does not have battery' - which has been marked as wrong, and the other people in the comments have confirmed that it is wrong, but I am still not sure why.

If the second meaning does not apply, then what is the correct way to say in Spanish that the battery is empty (in Romanian I would just translate the Spanish sentence word by word) ?

If, on the other hand, the construction 'The clock does not have battery' is wrong in English, have I just been using a wrong expression for years without having the slightest idea?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ncrebert
ncrebert
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reloj is the first Spanish word I've seen that ends in 'j'. it just doesn't look right

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoyceA
JoyceA
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If you are kind of a word nerd, check out this page for a list of 17 Spanish words that end in -j:

http://etimologias.dechile.net/?reloj

Apparently the etymology of "reloj" is a little murky, but it is sometimes said to come from the Greek "horologion" (something like "hour listing").

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aspenleaves

Awesome possum!! Thanks for posting this resource. I've been looking for an Etymology dictionary for Spanish for YEARS! Thank you!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

And I like 'awesome possum' never heard it before . cute. can I borrow it sometime?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aunteef

My daughters used to have a computer game with a possum as the main character, and "Awesome possum!" was a phrase often heard in that. I don't know if that's where aspenleaves got it though :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmiker54
jmiker54
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Yes thanks for the link I wish you could copy the words though so i could drop them into bing translater.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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To NancyRushing: Maybe this word comes from Arabic. I was told that the Spanish word for chess also has Arabic roots...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amir_Moussa

Native Arab here... I don't think that's correct. I can't think of any Arabic word even remotely resembling that. Do you know what it is?? The Spanish word for chess is 'ajedrez' (acc. to Google Translate), and I can't map that out into Arabic as well. I'm not an expert, though.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redeye011

what rule determines when an object, here "bateria" requires an article "una, la, etc."?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rachvx
rachvx
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Is The clock has no battery acceptable?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kees_b
kees_b
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Can somebody please explain to me why The clock hasn't got a battery is wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amir_Moussa

The tense you're using is the present perfect, but the one in the sentence is present simple. The meaning is close enough but the syntax is off. The sentence is correct in English (as far as I know), it just doesn't translate accurately to the original sentence. I'm assuming there is a present perfect in Spanish, so you would need to match the tense either way.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGarrick62

It's pretty clumsy English, but it would be understood.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmaclb

Clumsy or not, it's very common on the Eastern side of the Atlantic - and surely correct.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

It's a common usage in North America as well, though perhaps not quite as much as in Europe. In any case, please report it and DL will add it to the database of correct translations.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahTheEntwife

Does this mean "the watch doesn't have battery (and it needs one)" or "this watch doesn't have a battery (because it's a wind-up or something)" or is it ambiguous like in English?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jake_Squid_L09

no it doesn't have A battery, it has TWO batteries

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/solenoid.android

in that case i think they would add in the article

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JonathanWh20

First a car, then a clock. I'm getting Duolingo some rechargeable batteries for Christmas.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/__emerson__
__emerson__
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There wasnt a clock

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnetteArena

¿Por qué se debe usar GOT en esta oración? ¿Cuál es la regla?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ValienteSantiago

wth ?? where is UNA,??

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brigid
Brigid
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Spanish does not use the indefinite article as mush as English does. So even though it is not present in the Spanish sentence, in this instance it is required for the English translation to be grammatically correct.

Here are a couple useful links about this:

Spanish.about.com

Bowdoin.edu

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeahWilliams3

I didnt have bacteria as one of the suggested answers!!!!!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anna884683

Is there a difference between watch and clock?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charissa356006

There's no article before bateria but it won't accept my answer

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JBranch1998

Why not "the watch is out of battery?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jm_gariepy

That's just bad English. When you say that something is out of something, you infer that the thing it is out of is in a plural form.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JBranch1998

How is it bad English if it is what people who speak English say?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jm_gariepy

You know, this is interesting. It would never occur to me to say this, but I Googled it and found a number of people saying "out of battery", especially when referring to cellphones.

That said, as a native speaker living in New England, this sounds very wrong to my ears. "My watch is out of battery power" is fine. But saying something is out of battery is like saying "I'm going to give you an advice". Maybe it's fine in the abstract, but I'm not accustomed to it.

I couldn't find anything substantial to back up either your thoughts or mine. However, I did find this forum post that asks the same question. Four out of Five responders thought "out of battery" was wrong, with one holdout, who still thought it sounded wrong, but points out that they've heard it before and it may be trending among youth culture.

http://forum.wordreference.com/threads/out-of-battery.1643662/

As an aside, this seems to be a matter of 'battery' moving from a fixed item (a single AA battery) to an uncountable quantity (the amount of juice still in my laptop.) I doubt you would say "The jar has no pickle" unless pickle was a sort of sauce. You could easily say "The jar has no mustard" though, since mustard doesn't come in easy to distinguish units. Most clocks still operate on AAs. Though an Apple Watch doesn't. And as we go forward, single use batteries may become a thing of the past.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JBranch1998

I'm a seventeen-year-old male from Georgia, and it is a very common expression among those of my age group and my parents, but I do not know if that is because they picked it up from me, I from them, or if it has developed simultaneously across both generations. And you are totally correct in regards to it becoming an uncountable noun. I visualize the essence of battery as electricity if you can understand what I mean by that.

Observations: I would only say "The clock does not have a battery." if there were literally no battery (object) in the watch, or it did not require there to be a battery (in other words, mechanical or analog).

I can say "The watch has no charge." "The watch isn't charged." "The watch is dead." "The watch is not dead." "The watch is out of battery." or "The watch has run out of battery."

I can't say "The watch does not have any charge." but I can say "The watch doesn't have any charge left (to or in) it."

(And I'm sorry, I assumed you were a prescriptivist based off of your previous comment.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geogator

As usual, "the watch needs no battery" vs "the watch has no battery" Exactly what is the difference in meaning? None. You may know some ESL, but I am not certain about how much.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

There is a difference. The distinction between possession (tener) and necessity (necesitar). A watch that has no battery can need one, just like your car. The fact that the watch has no battery may mean that it, in fact, does need a battery -- so your two statements can have opposite meanings. Just because I don't have something does not mean that I don't need it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jazzdragon022

If you bring a watch to a repair person, thinking you need the battery replaced, they might tell you "the watch doesn't need a battery, it's broken." Like rspreng says.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aboyer02
aboyer02
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In one situation a lady takes the watch to the repairman and he tells her, "The watch doesn't have a battery. You need to wind it." Then the lady brings a different watch to the repairman. This time he tells her, "The watch doesn't need a battery. It's broken. You need a new watch."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TilEulenspiegel

A simple language instruction program should not require such mental gymnastics. DL too often makes things harder than they need to be.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

Sometimes it's me that makes it hard. I look for complications.& nearly always find them. "We have met the enemy and he is us"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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they're completely different words and meanings. The watch may need a battery but not have one - so it won't work.

5 years ago