"She walks all the way to the man's home."

Translation:Elle marche jusque chez l'homme.

March 9, 2013

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/eellrraatt

Where is the "all the way" in the french part?

April 12, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Totoro17

jusque

July 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/jcar88

I thought jusque meant until...not all the way. In the translation it says jusqu'au bout means "all the way"...so why is this not the direct translation?

December 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/alexiiiis_fr

http://dictionary.reverso.net/french-english/jusque I think it's implied? Not really sure though, hope an expert can enlighten us on this

January 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/piccolute74

If you look at the tips for this section on Duolingo, it states that when 'jusque' is used with 'chez', it means 'right up to the house/building' or 'all the way to the house/building'. In other context, it does just mean 'until'.

September 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/usual-suspect

That is my question too.

February 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/MrHazard

This does seem odd. Duolingo accepts both "Elle marche tout le long chemin jusque..." and the more pared down "Elle marche jusque..."In English, there's a (perhaps subtle) difference between "She walked all the way to..." and "She walked to..."

December 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/piscean59

Sometimes the hint is very confusing.

February 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/WarrenAdler

They gave "jusqu'au bout" as an acceptable translation for "all the way', but would not accept it in the answer. Pourquoi pas?

April 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/dapetras

why not 'jusqu'a'?

March 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Yuujen

Jusqu'à is just a contraction of jusque and à. Jusqu'à chez l'homme would be adding an unnecessary preposition.

March 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/alphabeta

But you need jusqu'à if you elect to say la maison de l'homme instead of chez l'homme.

June 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Yuujen

Because then there's no preposition already there; "Je marche jusqu'à chez l'homme" = "I walk to to the man's" while "Je marche jusqu'à la maison de l'homme" = "I walk to the house of the man".

July 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/dmarkovian

Duolingo accepted leaving out 'jusque' in another exercise, and suggested adding it in an alterbate translation. Now here only one is acceptable. This seems inconsistent.

February 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/pclayman25

What's the difference beyween jusque and jusqu'a?

March 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/cdeloy

the peak option for this sentence was not helpful.

April 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/neoscribe

Jusque chez l'homme sounds awkward to me. Shouldn't the idiom be jusque chez lui?

July 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Tamarama

Jusque chez lui, would be "up to his house". Jusque chez l'homme is "up to the man's house"

October 31, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/neoscribe

thank you for explaining this

December 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/greatlanguages

Why not "completement" (with the correct accent) for "all the way"???

March 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrew48

It would be like using "completely" in the English sentence, instead of "all the way."

April 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/sabrah786

What is the difference in meaning between jusque and jusqu'a?

July 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/FatmaSeif

why that is wrong ( elle marche tout le long du chemin à la maison de l'homme. ) ?

August 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/sfishlock

Elle marche jusque chez de l'homme ? Home of the man ?

August 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Kahyun

previous time someone said Jusque chez = Jusqu'à because both means 'up to/until', no?

September 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AlQuzMar

Chez il was not accepted whereas I think it would be perfectly adequate. Not literal of course, but in practice I think it would be both grammatically and semantically correct. No?

October 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrew48

No, it wouldn't be correct for a translation because you need to specify what "il" means. One can't assume that it stands in for a man without context.

April 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/FatmaSeif

why my answer is wrong ? (elle marche tout le long du chemin à la maison de l'homme. )

October 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrew48

I think it's because "à la maison" is a fixed expression meaning "at home." Used the way you did, it would mean that the whole way she was walking was at the man's house.

April 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/FatmaSeif

thanks :)

April 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/kellcow

"Elle se promene" instead of "Elle marche?"

October 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrew48

I think "se promener" is more like "going for a walk" than walking with a specific destination in mind.

April 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Adaliah_PL

Why was it OK for me to use aller in other sentences (Je vais jusque chez elle, Il va jusque chez elle), but here aller is wrong and only marcher is correct? Is there some logical, linguistic reason or is it just an error on the creators' part?

October 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrew48

It's because we're given "walk" here rather than "go," which is more general.

April 1, 2015
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