"Mizizi inaingia nyumbani!"

Translation:The roots are entering the house!

August 18, 2017

16 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vtopphol

Is this a very awkward way of expressing that your parents and grandparents are visiting?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catriona28475

My mother's house has two huge trees outside, and their roots have affected the foundations. Now one door doesn't close properly. (This is in rural England, btw.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PandorasGirl

It either means you're bringing the potatoes in or it is the reason the basement is leaking. I'm not exactly sure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nsikan9

I'm thinking they're trees around the house and the roots from the trees are somehow getting through the house


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lizlooney

"The roots are entering the house" is that something that someone would actually say?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/giraffe__

yes, you would say it if roots were getting into a house


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/whsndstalb

Nature strikes back


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JLBoutin

I keep getting corrected for not including the definite article. Mzizi can be "the roots" or just "roots", so I wonder why both answers are not accepted. Any ideas ndugu?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gigymbodze

Mzizi is singular Mizizi is plural


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TessEwing1

So, "into the house" is the same as "home". Would "into my home" still be "nyumbani yangu"? I assume it's not "nyumbanini yangu"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catriona28475

"Nyumba" means house.
"Nyumbani" means "to the house / into the house / in the house / at home", so I would guess that you don't need to add anything to "nyumbani yangu" (= into the house of mine) to say "into my home".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duoKalle

Is this one of those weird duolingo sentences or something that acctually makes sence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonWerman

It may not make sense if you live in a city, but it certainly does make sense where there are trees and houses!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fliss267566

why is this i-na-ingia and not a-na-ingia???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catriona28475

Check out Swahili noun classes:

For noun class 1/2 = M/WA (people and most living creatures), use the subject prefix "a-" with singular nouns and "wa-" with plural nouns.
For noun class 3/4 = M/MI (trees), use the subject prefix "u-" with singular nouns and "i-" with plural nouns.

So:
- "mzizi unaingia nyumbani" = the root is entering the house
- "mizizi inaingia nyumbani" = the roots are entering the house.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swahili_language#Agreement

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