https://www.duolingo.com/RichardsonDallas

Some Advice?

Hey pals, I'm super insecure about starting up with Esperanto. I'm a completionist sometimes, I really need things to have a definite beginning and end. Yes, cliff hangers DO ruin everything. This may be a problem with my love for language learning because 'learning' does not have a definite end. You never stop learning. With that being said; When do I get to tell myself that its okay to start Esperanto on Duolingo, with italki teachers and tutors, youtube videos, and even phone settings (if any of that is available at all.)

Everything I have is in Spanish. Everything is about Spanish. I started learning Spanish over a year ago, and I still feel incompetent. I stopped taking classes every week around June 2017 and started focusing on other things (I was cast in a musical and I work like two jobs) that would help me in life. I'm am at an intermediate - advanced level in Spanish. BUT EVERY TIME I THINK ABOUT EVEN STARTING ESPERANTO.. I think "Wow, I could be using this time to learn a new word in Spanish instead."

I find Esperanto very interesting, but I don't know... when did you decide to learn it. Is it possible to learn two at once? Thanks guys.

1 year ago

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JasonMey
JasonMey
  • 20
  • 19
  • 7
  • 7
  • 5

If you are a completionist who is not a perfectionist, I think Esperanto is the ideal language. What I mean by that is: as long as you are comfortable with calling something "complete" after having gained mastery, and not when you are "perfect" at it, then learn Esperanto.

After years with French, 4 formal years of study in high school, months on my computer with "Instant Immersion French" years ago, and months with Duolingo more recently, I still can't hold a complete conversation. I can read French okay, and can call up phrases, but any notion of mastery is still out of reach.

With Esperanto, I mastered a language within a year, all by myself, mainly with Duolingo and interacting with others online. And, while I know I can learn more, I do feel that the formal learning part is complete. Now, it's just using it and getting better the same way I improve my English - actually using it.

If your goal is "fluency," I would suggest that you make the goal more concrete by using something like CEFR (https://rm.coe.int/168045bb52) or ACTFL (https://www.actfl.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/public/ACTFLProficiencyGuidelines2012_FINAL.pdf). And I would recommend, if you haven't already, setting a goal here for Spanish as well, as it can help you to see what you need to work on. I've seen anything from B1-C2 and Intermediate to Superior being called the cut-off for "fluent." I won't argue any of that, as context matters. I could casually talk with a B1 speaker about the weather and need to explain nothing, but I could try to talk to a C2 speaker about types of clouds and have to explain every other word.

For me, B2 is enough. I reached B1 in Esperanto after about 8 months of study, doing 30-50 XP a day on Duolingo. B2 took a few more months and now I don't actively study, so I don't know how long C1 will take. Maybe a year or two? For now, I can read articles and posts and respond to them, watch the occasional Esperanto YouTube video, play Minecraft on an Esperanto server, and hold a conversation on Discord or in person. And I can read books and poetry with minimal assistance from a monolingual Esperanto dictionary. If that's what you want to do, you can probably get there in 12-14 months using Duolingo. If you also go all in on italki and watch Esperanto YouTube videos every day, you can probably get to B2 in well under a year.

Best of luck to you!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RichardsonDallas

Best. Response. Ever. and I love you? Thanks so much for your words of wisdom!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ionasky
ionasky
  • 25
  • 20
  • 15
  • 13
  • 12
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 952

I was going to respond but then i read what Jason said and thought yep, that. I have five years of french at school and as you can see my esperanto on duo and my spanish ( the tree i did first and which i have been doing for two and a bit years here) appear to be equivalent, but they are not. My Esperanto is way better than either of those - even though just doing ten to fifteen minutes a day can hardly be called knuckling down and studying hard. after finishing the course I was ready to read simple articles and watch basic videos, now at the end of a year of esperanto i can read most things, blog posts, books, magazine articles etc, with, as Jason says the occasional foray into the dictionary (mono lingual,or bi lingual - doesn't matter), watch videos with no subtitles, hold barbeques where we all use esperanto and discuss games, children, politics, history etc. I am still learning obviously and to that extent it is never finished, but if your goal is a usable proficiency of a language then esperanto may well suit you perfectly - greater mastery in a shorter period of time.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
  • 24
  • 18
  • 18
  • 17
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Esperanto is deliberately easy to learn, so you can reach competency in a much smaller time than with most languages. As additional languages go, you can't get much less of a commitment, time wise, than EO.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robwith1
Robwith1
  • 25
  • 25
  • 20
  • 14
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 948

Esperanto is new to me. I live in the Caribbean and I never heard of it. Duolingo asked me to try it and I did, then it was added to my profile.I am presently doing 5 languages and I find Polish the most difficult.I think if you do Spanish and French you can figure out most languages. I am retired.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EpicRuler1414
EpicRuler1414
  • 21
  • 12
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 2
  • 7

I am learning German, Spanish and Greek all at once lol. It's not that hard if you have enough time.

1 year ago
Learn Esperanto in just 5 minutes a day. For free.

Learn Esperanto in just 5 minutes a day. For free.