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  5. "今年はいい年でした。"

"今年はいい年でした。"

Translation:This year was a good year.

August 19, 2017

70 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/laazaz

2020: hold my ビール


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RamenDutchman

Hold my ウイルス


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KanKanMikan

hold my 抗議デモ too (protest)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ddbriggs

i wax nostalgic when I'm reminded of when "今年はいい年でした" was something someone might conceivably have wanted to say. 2017年は懐かしいです。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarrahW

今年は大変よくない年でした :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bodybody123

More like ビールを待つ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steven_Fisher

How does one "wait" a beer

Perhaps you meant ビールを持ってくれ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuisRolando3

It's over now guys


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yan.osh

well, yes. but the new try, 2021, is neither going to fit the sentence. :-/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ngochung72

When we read "to shi", and when do we need to read "nen" for 年?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex425703

メン(nen) is the onyomi - used when combined with other kanji to form a word, like 少年 (boy) とし(toshi) is the kunyomi - used when the kanji is by itself


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saiaikenja

Thank you so much, i wish they would include this kind of stuff in the app. Thank goodness for helpful commenters!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgiToki

But the audio reads 今年 as きょう とし even though it's paired with another kanji...so I'm confused


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/powelliptic

今年 when together is a word pronounced ことし. It's one of many arbitrary "spellings" you'll just have to remember. Japanese consists of words, not kanji. The latter sometimes take on unexpected pronunciations to fit the former.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Othique_

Ryker, the kanji are next to eachother but are not combined in this instance. Just because kanji are next to eachother in a sentence doesn't mean they are combined.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/happyenda

That's correct, but the katakana should be ネン ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iluvmemez

nen is ネン not メン(men) in katakana


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/msssima

There was a sentence "what is the year after next" and there "year" sounded "nen". So is it a mistake, or in 何年 it is onyomi reading?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrantRC

So is it a mistake, or in 何年 it is onyomi reading?

it might be better if you see those words as different words that share one kanji in particular

年 means "year" and is pronounced as とし but when in compounds the Chinese pronunciation ねん is usually used.

so adding the prefix 来-【らい】transforms it into "next year" and pronounced らいねん

if you add the prefix 再-【さい】to this, it transforms this into 再来年 "the year after next" and is pronounced as さらいねん

何年 is the question word for the counter ~年 is pronounced なんねん

今年 is one of the exceptions which means "this year" and pronounced as ことし。However, some people might use こんねん but is very rare.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChiaraWats

ネン not メン


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexandra562427

What's wrong with "this year was good"???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertEddy

The Japanese text uses the word for year twice. There would be no apparent reason not to use year twice in a translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

When the year close near the end, we say like this. Natural. Of course, the case what there are nothing to bad.

Though I don't know this sentence fit what kind of English. :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/romcheek

I'd still be inclined to say "this year has been a good year" the only time I would say "was" would be about past year


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

> When the year close near the end, we say like this. Natural.

When the year is almost over, we say something like this. It's natural.

> Of course, the case what there are nothing to bad.

I'm not sure what you meant here...

> Though I don't know this sentence fit what kind of English. :D

Though I don't know if this sentence fits (or "makes sense" or "is appropriate") in English...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

Dear @V2Blast

About second sentence

> Of course, the case what there are nothing to bad.

I want to say,

We say "this year was a good year", when the year is almost over. (I say that we say like that "every" year in first sentence. it is natural.) But of course we don't say this phrase when the year is bad year.

How should I do?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BluFoot

Here's how I would say it:

When the year comes to a close, we like to say this phrase. Of course, if the year was bad, we tend not to say it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

@BluFoot

I'm too late but thank you so much.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UW1r13

Speaking of this year, the year was a good year, yearn't?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Changman1337

この年はいいでした。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Remi_CCC

Why is "This year has been a good year" wrong? Since the year's still happening, isn't the present perfect continuous more appropriate?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elizadeux

でした is past tense. We don't know when this statement was made theoretically. It could have been at the very end of the year presumably.

I've read that you can't distinguish between the equivalent of the English present perfect vs. English past tense in Japanese using only verb tense. There have to be other indicators in the Japanese sentence. However, I'm still not sure how that's done. I do know that explaining the English present perfect to a Japanese person is not easy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KorpKyuu

so いい年 is いいとし and not いいねん. hum...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/michael.fe4

Most kanji have at least two readings. A "kunyomi" (literally a "meaning reading"), which is usually used when the kanji is by itself and an "onyomi" (literally a "sound reading") when the kanji is used in a compound word (well, look up "jukugo" to be more precise.

The (most common) kunyomi for 年 is とし, so it should be no surprise that it's pronounced いいとし rather than いいねん. It's not a compound word, it's just adjective - noun.

The (most common) onyomi for 年 is ねん. Which is why it is surprising that 今年 is pronounced ことし, using the kunyomi instead of こんねん using the onyomi. It's an exception and exists for historical etymological reasons and you'll just have to learn it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BluFoot

I think it's an expression, see sora's comment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SweetGoblin

You wouldn't say it WAS a good year if you are currently in the year, right? It's not letting me have 'Is'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LipByakko

From what I understood from this sentence, I assume that the speaker was probably very close to the end of the year; so I would say it's acceptable to say "it was a good year" even though it didn't end yet, but it's almost over.

About Duo not accepting your 'is' answer: that's quite simple. The 「でした」 part at the end clearly suggests past tense (as it's the past form of です), so the correct translation would be in the past tense as well (in this case, using 'was').

I hope this helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aniballovaglio

The verb is in the past tense. You should keep that in the translation. If it was not in the past, the implicit meaning changes. "This is a good year" "This was a good year" The second one implies that the year is almost over. Maybe you are having dinner by December 31.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VoluXian

I can accept 年 being pronounced as とし here, but why isn't 今 pronounced as its onyomi, こん in the least? If there is a reason.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pronikaust

今年「ことし」is an exception, as far as I've read. However, 今年「こんねん」is still correct, but it's rarely used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dai803021

I used "This is a good year", forgetting the past tense. Because I wouldn't say WAS until the year is over. Then it would no longer be This Year, of course. Bother all round, I say!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MilesBaker5

You can definitely say "this year was a good year" if you're not quite at the end of it. By saying "was", it just means that you're talking about the bit before then, which makes perfect sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RussianJun1

Could always think of it like hosting an annual event. You had a lot of guests, things ran smoothly, took in a lot of money or whatever: "This year was a good year."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/torianak

Why is "was" and not "is"? For example: "this year is a good year".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yalraurest

でした is past so it's "was"

If you want to say "is" you would write です


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lila-lingo

I honestly don't understand all the downvotes on the 2020 jokes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MilesBaker5

It's probably because there are way too many of them, and there are still people writing them, even though they can just look to see the preexisting 18 of them already there.

EDIT: It seems that they were all deleted, so thank you to any moderator that may have done that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aelfwine81

It says "toshi" for both incidences of the year kanji (sorry don't have Japanese keyboard). Is that the correct pronunciation for both? It has been telling me "nen" almost all the time until this question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrantRC

when using it alone, 年 is usually pronounced as とし。今年【ことし】is kinda like an exception, you can also say こんねん but this sounds like old Japanese, it also depends a lot on the accent I think, almost everyone says ことし though.

in いい年 is an adjective plus a noun, so is the word 年 alone.

in 今年, this is an exception, the other two I can think of are 一昨年【おととし】and 毎年【まいとし】, most of the time the compound uses the onyomi as in 来年【らい・ねん】though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aniballovaglio

'This year was a fine year' should be accepted I think.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kiki874643

The speaker says a different sentence from the answer...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MilesBaker5

It doesn't for me, what does it sound like the speaker is saying for you?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BMGX4H

2021: 今年も去年も一昨年は悪い年でした!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pookydeeda

why unacceptable ' this year was the good year'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Clara27769i

Why not いいねんでした?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Denzil568583

Dou needs to fix the many mispronunciations 今年 here should be きょねんnot ことし。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Swisidniak

今年 is correctly pronounced ことし meaning "this year"
去年 is pronounced きょねん meaning "last year"
They are different words

https://jisho.org/search/%E4%BB%8A%E5%B9%B4
https://jisho.org/search/%E5%8E%BB%E5%B9%B4


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Solis.Imperium

今年は悪い年でしたね...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ngtphu0905

Why "This year is a good year" not accepted? Aren't we still in the PRESENT year?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/michael.fe4

The sentence finished with でした which is past tense, so it would be incorrect to change the tense when translating.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FlapJack_28

This is not a past tense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Swisidniak

It is past tense.
今年はいい年でした
This year was a good year.
でした is the past form of です


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexMakaroff

"This year was good ." is CORRECT "This year was a good year." is INCORRECT, English people don't say that DUOLINGO, PLEASE LEARN YOUR ENGLISH.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexanderL2

No, Duolingo is right here. "This year was a good year" may be a bit redundant but it is grammatically correct. I don't think it sounds unnatural at all. It is also the most literal translation of the Japanese sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yalraurest

It doesn't sound unnatural at all and is a direct translation, the only reason you wouldn't translate something directly would be if it sounded weird/was INCORRECT but this sounds right.

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