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https://www.duolingo.com/Bricxjo

Pronouncing abbreviations & acronyms

Bricxjo
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So I got to thinking about mojoso, which Duolingo says is from reading the acronym of modern-jun-stila.

I am wondering if for kaj tiel plu or k.t.p. you would pronounce it as kotopo?

for antauxtagmeze or atm. to pronounce as atomo?

posttagmeze or ptm. as potomo?

Tell me what you think please.

1 year ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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Mojosa is a special case because it's an intentionally created word. A bunch of guys sat around one night and invented it. This is very rare in Esperanto. (As a side note, the English word "cool" is often used differently when borrowed into different languages, so when someone tells you that mojosa means "cool", what they really mean is that it means about what "cool" means in German, but not necessarily what it means in English.)

The abbreviation k.t.p. is routinely pronounced ko to po (but not /kotópo/). I've never heard p.t.m. pronounced po to mo. Somehow "posttagmeze" just seems easier. Same thing with a.t.m. which is usually read as matene.

Then there is "k.e.p." which stands for kiel eble plej. Sometimes I'll go out on a limb and pronounce or write it as kep - but only with other fluent speakers. I've never heard it read as "ko e po". Usually you'd just say "kiel eble plej."

Hopefully someone will post some links which go into more detail.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bricxjo
Bricxjo
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Thanks Thomas. What do you think about the text acronym mdr? mo do ro? And I have seen it as multe da ridoj, mort di rire, and mi mortas di rido (but I would think mi mortas di ridado would make more sense, but I am not sure.)

What is the difference between rido and ridado?

Thanks again, you rock!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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I can't believe I forgot about evosa, which means ege interesa.

It's about the same as the difference between laughter and a laugh. "Ridado" is defined as "Daŭra, opa rido".

I think of mdr as "... mortas de rido" and taken from French. (I first encountered it in French.) It seems a good number insist that it's "multe da ridoj" and is a literal translation of LOL (which in my book means "laughing out loud" and not "lots of laughs" ) -- which all goes to show you that Esperanto isn't the only language with this problem.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ionasky
ionasky
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Evosa = ege interese. Lol, or should i say MDR!!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jdroege

Salivanto's remarks match everything I have ever run into. Ko to po and mojosa are the only ones I use. You can use any you want, just be prepared to have to explain!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ionasky
ionasky
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Agreed, you certainly see them written down much more often than said though. Mo do ro, may eventually become so widely spread that it will be fully in the lexicon - in fact i expect it will given how prevalent the other language equivalents are. I hear ko to po about as often as i hear kaj tiel plu but personally i definitely prefer the latter.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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The first time I heard ko to po pronounced like that, I thought to myself "how hard is it to say kaj tiel plu?" It's only one extra syllable.

We do say "double you double you double you" instead of the shorter "world wide web" - so shortness can't be all that's going on here.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bricxjo
Bricxjo
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In that same vein, wouldn't tototo be shorter than tut-tera teksajo. And a bit of fun too.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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to to to was the normal way to say it -- but in 2017 that feels like a blast from the past.

1 year ago