https://www.duolingo.com/cleinias

Finished tree--and it is all golden

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I managed to complete the German tree and have it all golden in about 80 days.

My goal is to improve my reading skills to be able to read academic level texts in the social sciences (psych, sociology, philosophy, etc) as soon as possible. (I'd love to be able to speak the language and watch movies and TV in German too, of course, but it is not a priority at this point). Suggestions on how to get there would be greatly appreciated.

I am currently doing two courses on Memrise (the 5000 words ordered by frequency one, and Memrise's own German sequence, where I am currently at level 5). I took a (very quick) look at some of the courses offered by Deutsche Welle and by the Goethe Institute but they seemed very oriented to everyday interaction and not very helpful for my needs. Does anyone have experience with those?

8/22/2017, 3:38:45 PM

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Dorky_Dino

Try reading and then take the words you don't know and learn them on memrise. I recommend the Süd Deutsche Zeitung it has science articles. It will be slow going at first but the words will eventually stick. Readlang and Lingq can help you with this too. Also try clozemaster for another fun way at learning German words in context. Also listen to the radio a lot you might not udnerstand it all but it will create an immersion of German for you I recommend Deutschland Funk.

8/22/2017, 4:11:34 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/cleinias
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Thanks for the suggestions! I took a look at the Süddeutsche Zeitung...and realized I am still a long way off! But the idea is excellent

8/22/2017, 9:21:24 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Priit_

You need to make sure you develop your pronunciation as you read, it's not really a skill you can easily get after learning to read the language.

8/22/2017, 5:56:35 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaG1
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Wow! It is one thing to finish the German tree, but quite another to get it golden. I haven't finished a tree yet, but it is really hard for me to keep what I have learned golden.

8/22/2017, 7:04:52 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/cleinias
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It was a lot of work (between 150/200 XP every day), but it seems to have paid off so far. I mean, I can read simple texts pretty comfortably. I would say i spent an hour a day on Duolingo on average.

8/22/2017, 9:20:03 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/chrisbarbas

Try clozemaster instead of memrise. I think learning through context is better than each word individually.

Then add in some graded readers like Café in Berlin

8/24/2017, 11:36:52 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Cat-ka
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I am really lazy to sit and push something to my head. For me the best way how to learn language is to watch TV in targeted language. So Netflix is the best thing ever for me :D I am TV series lover, so I when i waste my time by sitting and watching something, at least I learn something by doing it. I watch everything in german with subtitles. Your passive vocabulary and understanding improves exponentially by learning this way. I dont translate all the words I dont understand, but those in which i am interested. Slowly with time you realize you understand everything Beginning could be difficult.

For me, learning only words doesnt work. if I dont see how the word is used in sentence or in real world, i am not going to remember it. I dont think this is a good way.

To improve all aspects (learning, listening, reading, speaking) I combine following : one to one skype classes with teacher, a lot of home works from teacher, duolingo, watching TV in german, reading artictles, switching all possible accounts (facebook, gmail,...) to german language, and I talk to myself a lot :D Try it out !

8/25/2017, 7:16:26 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/cleinias
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So I was familiar with readlang but not with lingq. I must say lingq seems to be like readlang except much better. You learn with real texts, and unknown words are saved in a list from which you are then drilled memrise-style (although in a lighter mode). New words are spoken to you, and the speech quality seems decent. The site is way more polished than readlang (which, as I understand it, is a bit of an abandonware project, as its creator now works for memrise).

Unfortunately lingq is not cheap, with subscriptions starting at $10 a month with an option of $39 a month. And you cannot really do anything with the free option (it's just a teaser).

8/28/2017, 4:12:11 PM
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