https://www.duolingo.com/BenLute

Irish Audio

BenLute
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I'm enjoying Duolingo's Irish course a lot but I wish it provided much, much more audio. For me, listening while seeing the word is the best way to get the hang of pronouncing the written text, and as it stands now, I feel that not enough examples are given. If the Irish course was like the Welsh course (with audio for every word that you click on) it would be perfect. What do you think; Go raibh maith agat.

1 year ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/-.Edwin.-
-.Edwin.-
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The Irish course, as other three or four courses, has real native speaker audio. Thus, you can enjoy a very clear pronunciation but, in the other hand, it is not available in every single exercise. It would implique thousands of repetitions on every word and phrase. For that same circumstance, neither is available the slow speak feature. Although, every word used in the course is said at less once in some moment by the person that lends her voice.

With my bad English, you will think that I am, unlike the Irish, electronically generated. But I don't!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/filipmc
filipmc
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The audio they have is nice, but it would be so much better if they had more. It would be great if they would let volunteers put in audio, and it would make it so much better for us beginners.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FloraPeach

I so much agree with what you have said. Please Duo, could we have more audio to go with the words? Just looking at the word and guessing how it might sound is challenging and frustrating. Given that when one actually hears the word spoken and how different it is to the spelling, it surely must be a priority if we are ever to learn to speak Irish. Thank you Duo, I know that you are doing your best and that it is a new language course, but please could you review the audio part??? I am Irish but was born in England and would love to learn my mother tongue.My parents spoke in Irish and I have quite a few words/sentences but would love to learn more. As Ben said above: Go raibh maith agat :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GiganticMorgan

there is an irish language synthesizer - type in words and hear the pronouciation in different dialects: abair.tcd.ie

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Artur_Hawkwing

There is also http://www.teanglann.ie/en/ which I have used quite heavily. I has recorded audio for tons of Irish words (for each dialect), plus definitions and expressions in which the words are used. It will pronounce one at a time, and often will not pronounce conjugated verb forms, but it is immensely useful.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sprivard

In a similar vein, I use http://www.focloir.ie/en/

I find hearing the words pronounced really helps me memorize it much more easily.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
SatharnPHL
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www.teanglann.ie and www.focloir.ie are both funded by Foras na Gaeilge, and they use the same set of audio recordings.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisSheret

I would also like to know what dialect is spoken in the Irish audio.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
SatharnPHL
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The current speaker is probably from North Connacht. She exhibits a couple of aspects of Connacht Irish (particularly in her plurals), but some of her pronunciation shades a little bit closer to Ulster Irish in some respects. Most of the time, though, she reads what is written, which is Standard Irish (An Caighdeán Oifigiúil).

1 year ago
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