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"Laat je de kleren daar liggen?"

Translation:Are you leaving the clothes lying there?

1 year ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Adrian54879

I typed "are you letting the clothes lay there?" and it was marked as wrong, and that the correct word would have been "lie" instead of "lay," but if we're going to get into the weeds about grammar, "lie" is incorrect, and "lay" is correct. "Lay always requires a direct object (the clothes) whereas "lie" does not. A person lies down. Or at least that's how I understand it.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dutchbulb
Dutchbulb
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This might be an American English thing, in British standard English we would definitely say "lie" not "lay"

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/letsrockltd
letsrockltd
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I don't think the clothes are a direct object here. They would be a direct object in a sentence like 'I lay the clothes down', but in this case they are not the object of an action but the things that are lying, so 'lie' seems correct to me.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tracey843948

You're right and wrong: completely right about what you say about 'lay' needing a direct object, whereas 'lie' doesn't. (But 'lay' can be the past tense of 'lie' here, which isn't the case here.) As letsrockltd says, the clothes aren't the direct object of 'lay/lie'. The sentence is really 'Are you letting the clothes to lay/to lie there, but in English we omit the 'to' part of the infinitive here. 'The clothes' is the direct object of the verb 'are letting'. But the clothes are being left to lay/to lie. They aren't laying anything themselves -- you need 'to lie' because you need a verb that doesn't need a direct object (an intransitive verb). Sorry if that all sounds enormously complex...

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NCThom
NCThom
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"lie" and not "lay" is correct here. The clothes are lying there. I'm asking if you're letting that happen.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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The clothes is actually the subject of the second part of the sentence. The object of the phrase "are letting" is "the clothes lie there" which actually makes a complete sentence by itself. That whole clause is the object, not just the words "the clothes"

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Helen613612
Helen613612
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Does Dutch have an equivalent expression to "floordrobe"? ;-P

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ameer272503

Can we replace daar with er here?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DatRosi

So i guess "laten" is kinda irregular and so we do not leave out the "t" at the end of "Laat"? Or why is this? Because as far as i know we usually have to do so.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
xMerrie
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Good question! "Laten" is kind of 'irregular', because the stem is "laat", so you don't add another t. Hence you don't remove it either. :)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DuoIngTheThing
DuoIngTheThing
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Why are the following translations wrong?

"Are you leaving alone the clothes lying there?"

"Are you leaving the clothes lying there alone?"

I must have not understood the "laat...liggen" (leave... alone) hint. I am guessing that the "alone" part is not even necessary in this particular translation.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NCThom
NCThom
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The construction "leave ... alone" is an idiomatic expression in English. We use it to mean do not touch it, do not talk about it, do not disturb it (or him or her) ... basically, do not interfere with it in any way. Leave it alone. We might also say Let it be, leave it be, let it lie, etc. In all of these cases, it is in a metaphorical sense: Don't "pick up" that subject: let it lie (on the metaphorical ground, unraised). Don't bother that person: let him be alone (with his thoughts or his work). Leave him alone.

In this Dutch sentence, Laat je de kleren daar liggen?, we know it does not mean the English metaphorical "alone," because we are given the state or location of the clothes: daar. The speaker isn't necessarily asking if you have not disturbed the clothes: she wants to know if you are leaving the clothes in that location (as opposed to putting them in the wardrobe where they belong, for example).

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DuoIngTheThing
DuoIngTheThing
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NCThom - The hint provided by DuoLingo is what actually threw me off. I totally comprehend the usage of the idiomatic expression "leave... alone". However, it did not make much sense to me why it was being suggested, so I ended up basically forcing its use in an attempt to make the translation work. But I quickly realized that there was actually no real use for the word "alone" in this particular scenario.

I feel like certain times these hints by DuoLingo do more harm than good. Had I not hovered over the words "laat" and "liggen", I would have been better off.

Nonetheless, your explanation of the construction "leave... alone", is quite solid and will prove to be helpful for non-native English speakers taking this course.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbigailNat10

Shouldn't there also be a "me" in it?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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Why?

1 day ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hessel.bierma

Why cannot be jij instead of je?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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They are pronounced differently, so they're not interchangeable in listening exercises.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusanRosen3

This in incorrect English. Clothes cannot lie--lying is an action taken by oneself. Clothes have to have been "laid" by another actor.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dutchbulb
Dutchbulb
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I am English English and would definitely say "the clothes are lying on the floor"

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dutchbulb
Dutchbulb
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but weirdly I would also say e.g. "would you please lay the clothes out ready for the suitcase"

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tracey843948

It's not weird. In your first example, the clothes aren't laying anything else down. You need an intransitive verb (one that doesn't have an object), so 'lying' (to lie) is correct. In your second example, you are laying the clothes down -- you need a verb that does have a direct object (clothes) (i.e. a transitive verb), so 'lay' (to lay) is correct. Your grammar is absolutely correct.

3 months ago