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"Het gaat daar hard achteruit."

Translation:It is going backward quickly over there.

11 months ago

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Tina_in_Bristol
Tina_in_Bristol
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Don't really understand this whole sentence (Dutch or English). Can we have a for instance? At first I thought it was to do with a geographical feature, such as a road or river, which suddenly turns back on itself. But what kind of thing would be going backward quickly over there? A UFO? Sorry, I know it's trying to teach the word, not context, but I'm having a really hard time imagining a plausible scenario.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dutchesse722
Dutchesse722
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The Dutch sentence is really a colloquial expression, so that's probably why the English translation doesn't make a lot of sense to you. Frankly, it isn't the correct translation. Hard achteruit gaan basically means that something/someone is deteriorating or getting worse rapidly. In Dutch it's often used with people who are sick and aren't getting better, i.e. Hij gaat hard achteruit (meaning his condition is deteriorating rapidly).

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tina_in_Bristol
Tina_in_Bristol
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Thank you for that. I thought it seemed a bit odd. The (British) English equivalent would probably be "going downhill" - this can be used of any situation that is deteriorating, including someone's health, but would be equally confusing to a non-native speaker, because of there being no actual hill!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dutchesse722
Dutchesse722
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Yes, going downhill quickly would be the appropriate English equivalent. There's one other way in which hard achteruit gaan could be used and that's when talking about reversing rapidly/quickly/swiftly, as in a vehicle. For example: Zij ging hard achteruit met haar auto = She reversed her car swiftly (hard really means with a lot of force in this case). But the Dutch exercise sentence doesn't seem to indicate that situation. To me, it means "It's going downhill quickly (over) there."

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OnkelD
OnkelD
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As one living in a hurricane prone area, and having experienced the deteriorating conditions as these monsters move in-- I can readily see using the expression: "Het gaat daar hard achteruit." -- but what I love is the alliteration and assonance of the expression! ;)

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DatKan

"going downhill" works in American English too. :) (I also came here because the sentence made no sense..)

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eric881015

I wish Duolingo had a way to highlight the colloqialisms.

But ill also chime to say that "it's going downhill quickly over there" is a much better English translation.

10 months ago