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J'encaisse

I ran into this meme:

J'encaisse, j'observe, je ne dis rien mais fais gaffe, j'ai très bonne mémoire.

I couldn't figure out what J'encaisse means. I think it's "I put up, I observe, I say nothing, but watch out, I have very good memory", but "I put up, I observe"? It doesn't quite work. I would think you see first before you put up with it.

I googled and found another version of it:

J'encaisse, j'observe, j'dis rien, mais j'retiens. I like this version better. It's succinct, and its cadence works better.

There is even a song named J'encaisse.

Would you please tell me what J'encaisse means? Thank you.

8/25/2017, 9:59:46 PM

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Fayke
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encaisser=to withstand (if we are not talking about money)

8/26/2017, 6:11:00 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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More like "I take it all in." http://dictionary.reverso.net/french-english/encaisser Be sure to scroll down.

8/25/2017, 10:16:31 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/LanguageButcher

Merci, but shouldn't one observe first before taking it all in?

8/25/2017, 10:20:26 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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One would think so. Perhaps "suck it up" is the better translation; "take it" rather than "take it all in". I guess I was adding the two together.
"Encaisser quelque chose bravement" is to "take something on the chin", so this is not going to be easy but handling it patiently without complaining. I can see where "box it" could be ported over to that. http://www.macmillandictionary.com/us/dictionary/american/take-something-on-the-chin

8/25/2017, 11:30:10 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/MarcD50
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That is the meaning, yes. 'Encaisser' certainly comes from 'encaisser les coups', when a boxer takes blows but does not show any sign of giving up.

In informal French, the verb is used intransitively (without the object 'les coups') in a figurative sense when someone says or does something hurtful to us, or something bad happens, and we do not react, or we pretend it does not hurt.

8/26/2017, 1:14:42 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/LanguageButcher

So combine with what Fayke says, the meaning then is "I resist, I observe, I say nothing but watch out, I have good memory"? There's a lot of resistance in the US right now, so it makes sense, but the one that sticks out like a sore thumb for me is "j'observe" that comes after it. If you resist, then you have already endured a lot. You should have been observed all this time. So why do you think it comes after j'encaisse?

8/26/2017, 12:13:03 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/MarcD50
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I think 'j'encaisse' and 'j'observe' alternate during the same period.

8/26/2017, 8:19:16 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Midnightwards666

I actually saw the word for the first time yesterday too, although not in the same sentence, and I think with a slightly different sense. If I see it again, I will show here. It seems to have multiple possible meanings, WordReference shows some examples of its usage: http://www.wordreference.com/fren/encaisser

8/25/2017, 10:51:57 PM
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