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"na" and "de" means "of" in Irish. How do we know when to use which word?? Go rabh mile maith agat!

1 year ago

11 Comments


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"na" means "the" for plural nouns. (It is also the genitive form used with some placenames.) "de" is a preposition.

https://www.duolingo.com/comment/4277962 Irish Grammar Portal http://www.nualeargais.ie/gnag/gram.htm Prepositions

http://www.nualeargais.ie/gnag/gram.htm de = of ("of the" = "den"singular or "de na" plural and there are more forms when combining with pronouns)

http://www.nualeargais.ie/gnag/gram.htm an = the (for singular nouns); na = the (for plural)

Which lesson were you on when you saw that?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/singaporeannn

Hi, thanks for your answer. Yes, I've learned that "na" is the plural form for "an" (the). What I mean was, for example, when we say King Edmund of Ireland, we say it as "Ri Eamonn na hEireann". Doesn't "na" here, translate to "of"? Thanks!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

It's not the na that translates to 'of', no. na singles the definiteness (Éire is a weird country noun that generally takes the article in the genitive but not the nominative whereas most have it in both). The genitive relationship (Éireann) is what signals 'of'.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/singaporeannn

Thank you very much! I think I get what you mean now. I guess the title such as "Ri Eamonn na hEireann" can be said as "the Irish's King Edmund". Correct me if I'm wrong: I notice that in Irish, the descriptive words is said after the object i.e. "na paisti beag" (the little children). Also, "Ardscoil Naomh Pol" (Saint Paul's Highschool) and "Athair mo mhathair" (My mother's father) shows how the nouns switch places when spoken in Irish, as compared to English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Rí Éamonn na hÉireann translates as “King Edmund of Ireland” or “Ireland’s King Edmund”; as galaxyrocker noted above, Éireann usually requires an article.

Some adjectives precede the noun in Irish: possessives, interrogatives, most numerals, and a handful of indefinites.

Your last example requires the genitive of máthair : athair mo mháthar.

1 year ago

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I think it still means "the" but it is simply the way they express the concept, much like we say "On Monday....." but in Spanish they say "El lunes" (the Monday) which amusingly in Irish seems to be "dé Luainn". So translating word for word can get you into mischief, check it expression by expression.

Prepositions are items that often don't translate well from one language to another. Different languages will use totally different expressions for the same thing. I see na used in relation to placenames, but not always used with places. The city of Rome = cathair na Róimhe. ( na is the genitive form)

http://www.teanglann.ie/en/eid/of

http://www.teanglann.ie/en/eid/na

http://www.teanglann.ie/en/eid/de

https://www.duolingo.com/comment/4277962 Irish Grammar Portal http://www.nualeargais.ie/gnag/gram.htm Click on "The Articles" and scroll down for a list of uses of the articles.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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More placenames require an article in Irish than in English; see here for country names (both with and without articles), and here for some city names (with articles).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Exactly, it's not na that means 'of', it's the genitive relation. na is just how you express the definite plural and feminine singular in the genitive case.

That said in Dé Luain isn't de. Two different things.

1 year ago

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Yes, I should have made that clear that the accent on "dé" makes it a completely different word.

1 year ago