"Waar ga je naartoe?"

Translation:Where are you going?

1 year ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/wbram4
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What's the function of naartoe in this sentence? Is there a difference between "Waar ga je" and "Waar ga je naartoe"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dutchesse722
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Waar ga je? isn't good Dutch. When going somewhere, we use the expression naartoe gaan or heen gaan. Waar ga je naartoe? or Waar ga je heen? can be translated as To where are you going? Of course, that's not said much in English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mons.Leb
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Some people say "where are you going to" in English. Same idea.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hyacinth3704

In the song "another suitcase in another hall" by Andrew Lloyd Webber, the singer asks repeatedly, "Where am I going to?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/khuang311
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I answered with 'to where are you going' but that was marked incorrect by Duolingo. Is it actually correct?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adamskj
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Yes, but the 'to' isn't necessary. 'To where are are you going'; 'where are you going to'; and 'where are you going' are all correct and all have the same meaning, but the 'to where' construction is the most awkward-sounding of the three.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dutchesse722
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"Where going you are to?" would be incorrect. "To where are you going?" is grammatically correct, as far as I know. You'll have to check an English grammar site to be absolutely sure.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenYoung84
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Even better is the (slightly) archaic "Whither goest thou?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adamskj
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'Where are you going to?' is fine. That whole "no prepositions at the end of a sentence" was a product of the imposition of Latin grammar rules onto English.

https://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2011/11/grammar-myths-prepositions/

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenYoung84
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I'm sick of people equating prescriptivism with Latin obsession. We need only look at non-extinct languages related to English including Dutch, German and French, Italian, Spanish, etc to see what is the done thing with prepositions. In all of these languages preposition stranding is rare or non-standard. Yet those who criticise prescriptivists set up a wonderful straw man argument that anything goes because the only alternative is turning English into Latin.

In most cases there is a logical reason why a preposition should be placed before its prepositional object. Without a strong argument to the contrary that's the best placement as it removes ambiguity and is more elegant. Now your link is not exactly written impartially, which is unfortunate. For most of the usage examples it argues that the preposition should be stranded because otherwise the sentence sounds too formal. So now being formal is a grammatical argument against doing something? The only good case it makes is for passive constructions which can become unmanageable without stranding. There's nothing wrong with having some exceptions to the rule but that doesn't mean there should be no rules at all.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
Mod
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"Naartoe" is part of "waar" in this case, because it is an indication of direction rather than a indication of position. You cannot drop "naartoe", but you can change it into "heen" in this sentence.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RuggeroRus

Even if Duo rejected it, "where are you heading" seems to convey well the meaning, doesn't it?

5 months ago
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