"Weet jij of het nu regent?"

Translation:Do you know if it is raining now?

1 year ago

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Ghis333
Ghis333
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when the second syllable is stressed, the word "regent" is not the verb "rains" but the noun "ruler".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pruto1
Pruto1
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Can "Do you know if it rains now" be accepted here? Bedankt!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
xMerrie
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No, it's incorrect. The sentence contains a word that indicates time, so the continuous shoud be used.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frebrijohrog
frebrijohrog
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x Merrie, Absolutely not. Both are grammatically correct and should be accepted even though the one containing the continuous tense is more common in this particular context.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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I agree both are possible in English. However, with simple present in this sentence "now" takes the special meaning that amounts to "at this specific time of the year." ("It's July; does it ever snow now?") It may be the case that "nu" does not have this flexibility, which would then limit the translation to present continuous on a Dutch basis. I would be curious to know.

EDIT: might also be time of day

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gio____
gio____
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wow never heard of this rule. in which lesson is it?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
xMerrie
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https://www.duolingo.com/monkey_47
monkey_47
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That link appears broken, but I agree with xMerrie. When you're talking about something that is currently happening and is temporary, you use the present continuous. Here's another link that supports that: https://www.eslbase.com/grammar/present-continuous.

"It rains." is a grammatically correct sentence, but combined with "now", you'd have to change it to "It is raining now."

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dystopia21

could "als" be used instead of "of"? if i'm not wrong they both mean "if", are they both used in the same way?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ameer272503

I believe Als can only be use for a condition if as in "if you do this, this will happen" the if here is different

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MisterLano
MisterLano
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"Of" means "or". In this sentense means "of" kind of "if". But "of" never means "als"

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anas276
Anas276
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Why the "t" in "Weet" has been kept, shouldn't it be removed?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kaloryth

I looked this up and it looks like its 'ik weet' and 'jij weet' so no change. https://en.bab.la/conjugation/dutch/weten

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Quasistar

Is it also correct to put 'nu' at the end of the sentence?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MisterLano
MisterLano
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Yes it is possible but not, but it does not happen often

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WillyCroez1
WillyCroez1
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No

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kirshner1
kirshner1
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I thought 'of' means 'or'

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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It means that, too: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/of#Dutch

I think it only means "if" when "whether" could also have been used.

3 months ago
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