"Is she drinking?"

Translation:Trinkt sie?

August 28, 2017

242 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ay-jay-jay

I'm having a hard time telling when to use a capitalized "Sie" for "she". Because i know "sie" can also be used for "they". But isn't one form supposed to be capitalized at all times or something?

September 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

The polite form for "you" is always capitalised: Sie. (Including its various case forms and the associated possessives for "your".)

The words "she" and "they" are lowercase sie. (Unless they come at the beginning of a sentence, since the first word of a sentence is always capitalised.)

This means that a sentence such as Ich liebe sie. is ambiguous -- it could mean "I love her" or "I love them".

If sie is the subject, though, you can tell the difference between "she" and "they" because of the verb ending -- here, for example, trinkt can only be for "she", not for "they": that would be Trinken sie?.

September 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kiara1420

I have so many questions I can't even start...

October 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelly591756

Start from somewhere dear,we all learning.ask and it shall be given

June 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wingtsuninja

So "I love them" wouldn't be "Ich lieben sie"?

April 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Correct, it wouldn't be -- it would be Ich liebe sie with the verb form liebe to match the subject ich.

April 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/C0rtana

No because "sie" is "she" no?

So to say Ich lieben sie would surely translate as I love she?

April 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 157

sie is both the nominative (subject) and the accusative (direct object) form, so it can be both “sie” or “her”. It can also mean “they” (as a subject) or “them” (as a direct object in accusative case).

In “Ich liebe sie” we know that sie can only be the object because ich is definitly nominative, so that has to be the subject. But whether it’s her or them depends on the context.

April 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZakyGanten1

If they or them you must use "Sie" big "S"

August 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

If they or them you must use "Sie" big "S"

No. That is wrong.

"they" and "them" are sie, lowercase.

(Except, of course, when they are the first word of a sentence.)

August 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NobbyRabet

Ich liebe sie

May 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AsumuWaya

Sir es tinkt

September 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zakdill

yooo impressive line up

September 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NettaIznard

Danke :D

May 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maddikatz

I heard context can explain a lot about a situation in German. Some words are similar, but if you know the context, things can be a lot easier!

July 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vindemmy

Nice

July 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sara239098

so sie can mean she, but also as you said it can mean they But there are two "types" of "they sie" One-which you capitalised you use when you are talking to someone older than you- it's a respect form Other one is not capitalised And yeah sometimes it gets kind of hard to recognise them but to recognise them you need to know the meaning of other words in the sentence

March 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NobbyRabet

Yes

May 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShubhamAPa

why not sie Trinkt ?

September 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Because yes–no questions start with the verb.

(English does this, too! We say "Is she drinking?" with the verb first and not usually "She is drinking?" with the word order of statement.)

September 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SineQuaNon16

Danke

March 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tanya768375

It condused me too

August 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tanya768375

I mean confused

August 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StarBendySUP

It's okay

July 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lord_Walder_Frey

that would be she drinks, I guess, I find it odd that it is drink she

October 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NobbyRabet

"sie trinkt" is correct, i.e, "she drinks"

May 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna880173

Not here though, since this sentence is a question

May 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amitverma498898

Can anyone explain why "es sie trinkt?" is not the right translation for the above

October 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Perhaps it would be easier to explain if you said why you think it is correct.

Es = it. That's not even in the English sentence.

sie = she. So far so good.

trinkt = drinks / is drinking

Yes-no questions in German, as in English, start with a verb.

October 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Henry264662

But what about "Ist sie trinkt?" for "Is she drinking?" vs "Trinkt sie?"? Wouldn't that be "she drinks?"?

July 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Ist sie trinkt makes no sense in German.

Trinkt sie? (German present tense) can be translated as either "Is she drinking?" (English present continuous tense) or "Does she drink?" (English present simple tense) -- German does not make this distinction.

July 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmanuelSa616607

This statement you made is very important. As English speakers trying to learn German it's important we don't try to learn according to the English language logic.

July 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aaron64976

I totally understand you :)

August 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aaron64976

Thank you so much! That was super helpful!

August 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NobbyRabet

This is a wrong sentence. The correct sentence ls "Trinkt sie?"

May 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lukedonahuej

I m having so much trouble

September 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-KingMondo-

Try figuring out what exactly you are having issues with by starting from the very beginning and advancing step by step. The minute you find something you can't seem to understand, ask a specific question on the corresponding forum and someone should respond with an explanation. Note that it is also very important to hover over the words in each question, especially if you are a beginner. This way, you can easily begin understanding each word and the appropriate grammar. Sometimes when learning a new language, one must step back from the obstacle and even backtrack.

April 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NobbyRabet

Agreed!

May 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Girlcatlove1524

German is a difficult language, you can ask me if you have recurring questions :)

December 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TropicalBat

Have we even learned about sentence structure yet? Because I don't think I have yet I get this question...

December 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 157

Basically if you want to form a question that requires “yes” or “no” as an answer, you move the verb to the beginning (if the verb consists of multiple parts, then move only the inflected part). You do this regardless of the verb; you never need to worry about whether or not to add in “do” like you have to in English.

December 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brandon719479

This was most helpful thank you for your insightful comment.

July 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna880173

Have you checked the light bulb icons on mobile and whatever the equivalent is on pc? There are explanations for each lesson

May 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

whatever the equivalent is on pc?

Also a lightbulb:

Note that the lightbulb is (unfortunately!) not available to all mobile users -- some have it, some don't.

May 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna880173

Thanks, I was only using the app and haven't used browser Duolingo for literal years, so I wasn't sure if it looked the same.

But now I'm just confused as to why some users wouldn't have those text explanations available. No wonder they're getting so confused about word order or continous tenses...

May 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

But now I'm just confused as to why some users wouldn't have those text explanations available.

I have no idea what guided that decision, either.

I heard a rumour once that they thought the tips and notes (which often use tables) wouldn't format well or look good on smaller screens. No idea whether that influenced the decision or not.

No wonder they're getting so confused about word order or continous tenses...

Indeed.

And instead of having the answer in one place in the tips and notes, there are questions scattered over dozens of sentence discussions, with more or less correct answers....

I wish that those users who do not have access to the tips and notes would also be denied access to the sentence discussions. (Like with the iOS app, at least when I used it.)

May 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Star618762

What does the key do?

August 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joelthedolphin

what is the difference between "sie trinkt" and "trinkt sie"

September 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo
  • Sie trinkt. = She is drinking. (Statement.)
  • Trinkt sie? = Is she drinking? (Question.)

As in English, the verb comes first in the question.

(Though in English questions, the verb that comes at the beginning is often some form of the helping verb do which German does not need.)

September 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WORMSS

I guess the problem is, English has

  • She drinks! (Statement)

  • She drinks? (Question) Verb does not come first.

January 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"She drinks?" is not neutral question word order, though.

It's what I call a "surprise/confirmation" question, where you heard something surprising and you want to confirm that you heard it correctly. It's a rather specialised type of question.

In German, Sie trinkt? (with statement word order but question intonation) can be a similar surprise/confirmation question.

January 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlieBab8

Are you like a professor or something

July 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rooseveltnut1

Drinks she.......... Should I think of this in my head as Drinks she? I'm trying to figure out a way to remember this. You say the verb comes first 'As in English' but this looks NOTHING like English to me!

May 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MohammadEmon7958

"Sie trinkt"→why doesn't it mean "She drinks"?

March 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

It does.

Sie trinkt. can mean either "She drinks" (habitually, regularly) or "She is drinking" (right now).

March 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheBreadQueen05

ありがと!!!!!

November 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARW1989

Why the bloody hell is it not "Ist sie trinkt"? Please explain.

September 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Because "Is she drinks?" makes no sense.

The present tense (sie) trinkt can be translated into English either as "(she) drinks" or "(she) is drinking".

German does not have a continuous aspect formed with "to be" like English does. Trying to put "to be" into a sentence like that will just produce nonsense in German -- just like you can say "She drinks milk every day" but you can't say "She is drinks milk right now" with an "is" in there -- "is drinks" doesn't work and neither does ist trinkt.

Just use the simple present tense in German, even for things that are happening right now.

September 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AjWFi2

How do you keep up with remembering which to use and which not to :( im understanding what your saying about not disecting it word for word but i just dont know how to keep track, or even know which to use so that you dont sound like utter nonsense in front of a german person :(

January 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Suraj62268

Hallo. Can anyone explain when to use trink-st, trink-en or trink-t ?

July 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 157

It depends on the subject. In English you only add a suffix if the subject is a third person (a “he/she/it”). In German there are suffixes for all six grammatical persons:

  • ich trink-e
  • du trink-st
  • er/sie/es trink-t
  • wir trink-en
  • ihr trink-t
  • sie trink-en
July 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kate_Joy

Do these endings hold good for all verbs, please. I note that Sie is not on the list but ihr is.

September 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 157

These are the present tense endings for almost all verbs – with certain caveats:

  • If the stem ends in -t-, an e is inserted before the endings that don’t already have one. For example arbeiten “to work”: du arbeitest, ihr arbeitet etc. (because *arbeitt would be difficult to pronounce)
  • Some verbs also feature a small stem change (typically a vowel change) in the second and third person singular (the du and er/sie/es forms), e.g. geben “to give”: ich geb-e, du gib-st, er/sie/es gib-t, wir geb-en…
  • A couple of verbs show greater irregularities. These are only a handful, but they tend to be rather common, most importantly sein and the modals (“want, must, can…”), both of which tend to be wacky in many Indo-European languages (in English for example, to be is the only verb with three different present and two past forms, while modals don’t take the third person -s (“*he cans”) and don’t have an infinitive (“*to can”)).
September 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

du gibst, not du giebst.

September 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 157

Right, fooled by the long /i:/… (in my defense, Rilke wrote “giebt” as well :D )

Thanks for notifying; I corrected the blunder.

September 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kate_Joy

Thank you for explaining the verb endings. It is very much appreciated. The English grammar part is very helpful, too. I was in the Government's 'Freedom of expression instead of English grammar' experiment. We all ended up loving poetry but it was not so great for learning languages, etc!

September 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TanviNath

Would it be wrong if 'ist' is included as the translation of 'is'?

September 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes.

Because you can't translate word for word -- you have to translate the meaning and the grammar.

"is" in this sentence is part of "is drinking" which is the present continuous tense in English.

German doesn't have a present continuous tense so you have to map that to the German present tense, so the two-word phrase "is drinking" turns into the one word trinkt.

September 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ethan554107

Ohhh... Thank you so much!

March 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NobbyRabet

No

May 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna880173

It would be wrong though. See above

May 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WTFTROLLKI

why ' ist sie trinken ' not correct??

October 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Because that makes no sense German. It's like saying "Is she drink?".

See the other comments on this page about no continuous aspect in German.

October 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WTFTROLLKI

ohhhhhh then how about hat sie trinken??? does this mean does she drink???

October 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No. Hat sie trinken? makes no sense in German.

Hat sie Trinken? with capitalised Trinken means "Does she have (some) drink?" i.e. does she have something to drink.

English needs "do" with most verbs in order to ask a question, but German does not.

To ask, "Does she drink?", you simply ask, "Trinkt sie?"

To ask, "Is she drinking?", it's also "Trinkt sie?" -- in German, you don't have to worry about whether something is present simple or present continuous; it's just present tense.

October 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Unfriendly101

Why can't I just type: Ist sie trinkt? Instead of: Trinkt sie

October 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Because "Is she drinks?" makes no sense in either language.

trinkt does not mean "drinking".

German does not have a continuous aspect formed with the verb "to be".

So you can't translate "Is she drinking" word for word into German. You also have to translate the English grammar into German grammar.

October 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clair_brodie

My response was 'Ist sie trinkt' which is technically correct.

October 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No, it's not correct, technically or otherwise.

No more than, say, "Is she drinks" would be.

October 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ankitha77426

i can't understand y is is not included in the sentence in german

October 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-KingMondo-

When translating a sentence from German to English for example, the grammar would not be correct in English. This requires yet another "translation" to allow the meaning of the sentence to make sense in English. This is often the case in languages that have different rules where grammar is concerned, like German.

For example, "Trinkt sie?" means "Is she drinking?" Directly translated, you would have "drinking she?" However, you must account for the grammar and "translate" it to understandable English, which would be "Is she drinking." In order to comprehend this, you must pay close attention to the grammar rules.

April 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Translating isn't an exercise that simply involves replacing words. German has a different grammar from English and so translation will often involve doing things with grammar as well.

"is" isn't a full verb with a meaning of its own in this sentence; it's a helping verb used to make the present continuous tense of "drink", as in "is drinking".

German doesn't have a continuous aspect in its verbs; the equivalent of the English present continuous and the English present simple is usually simply the present tense in German.

So you will translate the present continuous form "is drinking" of the verb "to drink" into the equivalent German present form trinkt of trinken.

October 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DejoDevasi

Why can't it be " Ist sie trinke" ?

October 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Because "is she drink?" makes no sense in either language.

Also, German doesn't have a continuous aspect formed with "to be" -- so English present continuous "she is drinking" and English present simple "she drinks" (for repeated actions) both translate to the German present tense sie trinkt.

You can't add ist to that and expect it to make any sense.

Also, trinke is the verb form for ich (I) -- ich trinke "I drink; I am drinking". You can't use it for sie. (At least not in a simple sentence like this one.)

October 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheToknSquirrel

I appreciate that you keep reiterating the same response each time this question pops up. And that it's not a copy paste response (unless i missed that it is lol).

July 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frodo38267

You are really trying, keep it up. I wish I could have a person like you to help me out in my German.

August 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielJac999238

A tad bit hard.

December 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Girlcatlove1524

If you have questions I would love to help :)

December 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yelurisria

Why can't it be "ist sie trint?"

December 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

This is explained in the tips and notes for the very first lesson - https://www.duolingo.com/skill/de/Basics-1 . See the section "No continuous aspect", please.

Please always read the tips and notes before starting a new unit. Note that the tips and notes are currently only available on the website, not in the mobile apps, so the mobile apps are not very good for learning new material.

December 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Henry264662

Sounds like a big flaw in the educational aspect of the app...

July 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

I agree.

July 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tara939060

Die esdr

March 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aaron_0

Im sorry...how would I know this at this point in the lesson? I am completely new to the language and they never showed me the word sie and how to use it. :(

April 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-KingMondo-

In every question where you are given a sentence in German, you can hover over each word to see the meanings. It is more than likely you already encountered the word, but never understood the meaning and correct grammar associated with the word. Be sure to pay close attention to every question and refer to the forums if you have any questions.

April 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wizodd

You are not always expected to know the answers, but you may find that you do if you go with your first instinct.

It's not like anyone cares how many times you fail in order to succeed!

June 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaurenC344124

How come its not sie trinkt?

May 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Because it's a yes–no question -- those start with the verb.

May 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaurenC344124

Drink she? Isn't that backwards?

May 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No.

English does this, too, with some verbs -- e.g. "He can swim." (statement) versus "Can he swim?" (question).

With most verbs, English needs "do" to form a question (e.g. "He swims." versus "Does he swim?"), but German simply puts the verb first for all verbs, not just "to be" or modal verbs such as "can".

May 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sophie593806

how do you know when to switch the words around??

May 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes–no questions start with a verb.

Statements have the verb in the second position of the sentence.

May 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kitcat685

Why isn't it "ist sie trinkt? " Sorry I'm just like really confused aren't both ways saying the same thing?

May 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Girlcatlove1524

Think about it this way, the verb trinken translates to 'is drinking' or 'drinks' therefore, you do not use the word ist because the verb already includes that! :)

January 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Neil721931

I see... so it is grammatically correct then in the German form. Ill be sure to keep that in mind, th thought hadn't occured to me

June 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bob821972

I bet everybody got this wrong

July 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tanya768375

Is she drinking is spelled backwards?

August 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AARONIOCCA

I keep having a hard time remembering that German doesn't have -ing >~<

August 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SexGod3

How to differentiate betweern trinkt,trinke and trinken? Thanks

September 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 157

It depends on the subject. In English, you have to add an “-s” whenever the subject is a third person singular (“he/she/it”). In German there is an ending for every grammatical person:

  • ich trink-e
  • du trink-st
  • er/sie/es trink-t
  • wir trink-en
  • ihr trink-t
  • sie trink-en

In fact as you can see, the verb ending is the only thing that differentiates between sie “she” and sie “they”.

September 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erik26550

Just stumbled across this sentence pattern. Hopefully there's more practice because i haven't been taught how to word questions just yet

September 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Girlcatlove1524

If you have any questions, I'll be happy to help you out further!

January 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saraths8

Q1. Does she drink? , Is it the same translation as 'Trinkt sie?' Or is it the translation only for 'is she drinking?', because there is no present and present continuous tenses separately. Q2. Is there any other way to ask 'is she drinking?'

September 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

1 - Trinkt sie? could translate to either “Does she drink?” Or “Is she drinking?”.

2 - if you want to talk about something that is happening right now, you can add an adverb: Trinkt sie gerade? “Is she drinking right now?”

September 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuanReyes471988

Hey, unrelated to the question itself. . . what's the difference between "ein" and "eine" I thought one was masculin and one was feminine. Then I got stumped on "A girl, a woman" because the sentence I was supposed to write was "Ein Madchen, Eine frau" or something

November 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 157

You are correct, eine is for feminine nouns, ein for masculine or neuter ones (in nominative case at least). The problem is, grammatical gender is its own thing and doesn’t necessarily have to match biological sex. For people (and animals with personal names) it usually does but there are certain exceptions – one of them being that any word with the diminuitive (“little”) suffix -chen is always neuter. And since the word Mädchen was originally formed with this suffix (it comes from an earlier Maid-chen “little maiden”), that makes it grammatically neuter.

And for non-living things (as well as generic animal species names like “dog, cat” etc) it’s for the most part completely random: There is nothing inherently feminine about things like Tür “door”, Lampe “lamp” etc, and nothing inherently masculine about a Tisch “table” or Stuhl “chair”, and yet those are the genders assigned to those words. This is why you should always learn a noun together with its definite article der, die or das – because you can immediately tell the gender from that.

November 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaserDuck

So the question structure in German for such questions is verb+subject? Like in English it'd be either do/does+subject+verb or am/is/are+subject+verb+ing but it seems different here.

November 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Girlcatlove1524

Yes, generally when asking a question you start with the verb and then the subject c:

January 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarlosFons237158

What os is ?

January 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 157

German doesn’t have a dedicated progressive (“to be x-ing”) form; we just use the plain present tense and infer from context if we’re talking about something that is happening in this very moment or just generally. Or in those rare cases where we really need to stress that it happens in this very moment, we add an adverb such as gerade “right now”.

January 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trevor600240

She and drinking got flipped! Is that how you mske it a question?

January 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Sort of.

You make a yes–no question by putting the verb first.

Statement: Sie trinkt. “She drinks. She is drinking.”

Yes–no question: Trinkt sie? “Does she drink? Is she drinking?”

Note that German does not need helping verbs to form questions.

January 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/siopao69

Why not "ist sie trinkt"?

February 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 157

Because German doesn’t have a progressive (an equivalent to the English “to be …-ing” form). We just use plain present tense.

Also, please at least have a quick scan over the existing questions and see whether somebody asked it before. In this case it has been, for example WTFTROLLKI and MutasimFua among many others.

February 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tashekia2

I just got this wrong because I wrote this the other way around

February 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 157

“sie trinkt” is a statement “she drinks/is drinking” rather than a question “does she drink/is she drinking”.

February 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brian733676

Is that how you ask a question in german?

April 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 157

Questions (at least those which are answered with “yes” or “no”) are formed by moving the verb to the beginning, yes.

April 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ollie20081

Why isn't it es trinkt sie can someone explain

April 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 157

es means “it” and there is no “it” in the sentence.

If you meant ist: (Standard) German doesn’t have a progressive (an equivalent to the English “to be x-ing” form). We just use simple present tense, regardless of whether the action is happening at that very moment or regularly.

April 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChochamCho

Why is it not 'Sie trinkt'?

April 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Because this is a yes-no question, not a statement.

Yes-no questions start with the verb.

April 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex491632

It didn't taught how to write question before!

April 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ananth300503

Can't we write it as Sie trinkt?

April 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No.

Yes-no questions start with a verb in German.

April 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TMKitty102

Why would "sie trinkt" not be acceptable here? Why are the words switched?

May 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes-no questions start with the verb.

Just as in English, where “is she drinking?” starts with the verb “is”, the German translation trinkt sie? starts with the verb.

As a statement, the verb is in the second position: “she is drinking”, sie trinkt.

May 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LyndonBurr

Can anyone tell me why you say Trinkt sie versus ist sie Trinkt....like Drinks she dosent sound right versus is she drinking?

May 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 157

You cannot expect to exact word for word translations to turn out correct because even beween which are as closely related as English and German, there are significant grammar differences.

In this case the problem is that German doesn’t have a progressive form (an equivalent to the English “to be …ing”). We just use normal present text and decide from context.

And the reason why “*drinks she” doesn’t sound right to you in English is because (modern) English can only pull a small subset of verbs to the front to make a question (including “to be” and ”to have”). For all others you need to add a dummy “to do”: “do you drink”. German didn’t develop such a restriction; you simply pull the conjugated verb to the front, regardless of what type of verb it is.

May 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna880173

German verb conjugation works differently than English and German also has fewer tenses than English.

  1. German does not have continuous tenses. You are fully dependent on context to know the meaning. If it's in the presence, you use the present tense. "Sie trinkt." means both "She drinks." and "She is drinking".

  2. Verb endings. We have trink-en, where trink is the root (simplified), -en is the ending. German verb endings for singular are -e (Ich trink-e), -st (du trink-st), -t (es/sie/es trink-t).

  3. German word order has very strict rules. For a statement, it's subject-verb-object. Sie trinkt Wasser. In some cases, it can be object-verb-subject when you're putting emphasis on the object, such as "Wasser trinkt sie nicht" ("She does not drink water", emphasis on water, so she probably prefers something else. You cannot always do this though.) For now, let's stick to SVO for declarative sentences - Sie trinkt Wasser. For questions, however, it is verb-subject-object. Same as in English, but German needs no auxiliary verb for the present tense. In English, the question made from "She drinks." would be "DOES she drink?" where "does" is an auxiliary verb. German doesn't need that, so the question is simply "Trinkt sie?" Since German has no continuous tense, both "Sie ist trinkt" and "Ist sie trinkt?" are grammatically incorrect and make no sense in German.

  4. Capitalization. German capitalizes nouns, beginnings of sentences and the formal you (Sie, used as plural). So even if German did have a continuous tense, it could not be "ist sie Trinkt", it'd be "Ist sie trinkt?". But since German does NOT have continous tenses, let's not go there.

Is that understandable now?

May 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

For questions, however, it is verb-subject-object.

True for yes–no questions, but not for WH questions, which have the verb in the second position and the WH word or phrase at the beginning. (As in English.)

May 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amy695583

Im so confused how does is she drinking translat to trinkt sie wouldn't that be drinking you ?

May 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna880173

It wouldn't. You can never translate word for word, languages don't all work the same. "Drinking you" makes no sense in English, and a literal translation of "does she drink" probably wouldn't make any sense in German.

  1. "Trinkt" does not mean "drinking". The infinitive ends with -en (trink-en = to drink), then the endings go as follows: -e, -(e)st, -(e)t, -en, -(e)t, -en. Ich trink-e, du trink-st, er/sie/es trink-t, wir trink-en, ihr trink-t, sie/Sie trink-en. I drink, you drink, he/she/it drinks, we drink, you drink (informal, plural), they/You drink. The capitalized Sie is formal and can also only address one person. I capitalized it in English for clarity, though English obviously doesn't have that.

  2. "Sie" can mean a lot of things. In singular, it means "she". "Sie trinkt" = "she drinks" or "she is drinking" (German has no continuous tenses). That is the case in this sentence. In plural, the verb ending would be -en and "sie" would mean either they (if not capitalized) or (formal) you (if capitalized). If it's at the beginning of the sentence, it's always capitalized and you need context. When unclear, in sentences such as "Sie trinken.", Duolingo accepts both you and they in the English translation. Here, however, it's clear. We're moving from English. From "is", we know the sentence is singular, and "she" is "sie". If the sentence were "Do you drink water?", it could be a) Trinkst du Wasser? (Informal, singular you) b) Trinkt ihr Wasser? (Informal, plural you) c) Trinken Sie Wasser? (formal you) All 3 would be correct and you'd need context. Duolingo should accept all three if such an exercise ever comes up.

  3. The word order. I will not go into detail, so please know that I'm only covering the basics and there's a bit more to it, you will learn that later, it'd confuse you now. German has pretty strict word order rules. The verb is second in a declarative sentence. It usually goes subject-verb-object (Ich trinke Wasser). I could say "Wasser trinke ich nicht", I'd be emphasizing water, probably strongly implying that I prefer something else to water. The verb would come second, then the subject, then the rest. For yes-no questions, German and English are almost the same! First the conjugated verb, then the subject. English, however, uses an auxiliary verb. If you rephrase "She drinks." into a question, you'll get "DOES she drink?", where does is an auxiliary verb, notice the -s in "she drinkS" is gone in the question, "does" is the conjugated verb. German does not use those here, so you only need to move the conjugated verb. "Sie trinkt." then becomes "Trinkt sie?", but translates to "Does she drink?" or "Is she drinking?", depending on context.

So "trinkt sie" wouldn't be "drinking you" because: 1. There is no "you" in the German sentence. 2. You cannot copy word for word, sooner or later you'll get nonsense due to differences in grammar.

May 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anamika855709

Please help me i'm confused

May 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 157

Would you mind telling what exactly you’re confused about (ideally after checking if your question was already answer – for this short sentence there’s a good chance). Otherwise it’s a bit difficult to guess ;)

May 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anirudh105241

How to use trinkt?

May 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 157

It’s the third person singular, i.e. the form you use if the subject is a “he/she/it” – equivalent to English “drinks/is drinking”.

May 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StarBendySUP

I like how helpful you are and I needed the help so.... Thank you

July 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/charlotte126594

When do you not need to use "is" with trinkt ?

June 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 157

You never need is. German has no progressive (an equivalent to the English “to be …-ing”). We just use normal present tense and let context (or adverbs like “now”) decide if the action happens right in that moment or regularly.

Also, in the future, please help reduce clutter by having a quick scan over the discussion if your question has already been answered.

June 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DikshitSoo

Can someone please explain the logic behid interrogative sentences in German and how they are different from English ? Appreciate it!

July 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes–no questions in German start with the verb. (As in English, e.g. "Can you come? Are you sure?")

They do not require a helping verb such as "do" - the "meaning" verb simply comes first, e.g. Trinkst du? = Do you drink? Are you drinking?

July 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrs507065

Never been taught before asking it, so it's impossible to know the real answer if your just getting started.

July 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZafarUllahZU

is it not ist sie trinkt

July 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 157

No. For more detail, see multiple previous answers, including to questions from ARW1989, TanviNath, LyndonBurr, Unfriendly101, ankitha77426………

July 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexx660635

What exactly is the order of sentence structure in german?

July 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 157

In declarative main clauses: conjugated part of the verb in second position. If there are more parts to the verb (e.g. participles), those go to the very end. Most of the rest is more or less free and can be switched around at least to some degree for emphasis.

In questions: The same, except the conjugated part of the verb is now in position 1 (excluding question words if there are any).

In subordinate clauses: SOV

July 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/abbas710292

Can any one please explain,why "ist sie trinkt? Is not the correct translation

July 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Can any one please explain,why "ist sie trinkt? Is not the correct translation

Because it's grammatical nonsense in German. The ist has no function in that sentence.

German does not distinguish between present simple and present continuous, so Trinkt sie? can mean either "Does she drink?" or "Is she drinking?".

July 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/steven703149

Google says trinkt sie. Is she drinks. is she drinking

July 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 157

It doesn’t for me, but even if it did, it’s wrong about “is she drinks” (which isn’t even a correct English sentence to begin with).

July 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hamzotta

Bro that wrong af

July 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_h.alcyon_

Why trinkt sie? Why not ist sie trinkt?

July 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

German doesn't need a helping verb for the present tense.

Statement: Sie trinkt.

Question: Trinkt sie?

No need for any ist in there, unlike English which needs a helper.

July 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emma754

My goodness!!am totally lost i am trying to read comments but nothing,i dont understand..according to what am learning throught the comments its "sie trinkt"but am still wrong,or maybe there's a capital letter somewhere?

July 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Sie trinkt. (verb in the second position of the sentence) is a statement -- "She is drinking."

Trinkt sie? (verb at the beginning of the sentence) is a yes–no question -- "Is she drinking?"

July 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brandon719479

Why is Trinkt(is drinking) before sie(she). Shouldn't it be Ist sie trinkt?

July 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Why is Trinkt(is drinking) before sie(she).

Because the verb comes first in a yes–question.

Same reason why we say "Is she drinking?" and not "She is drinking?" -- yes–no questions start with a verb in English, too. (Though this verb at the beginning is often a helping verb such as "does...?" or "is ...?".)

Shouldn't it be Ist sie trinkt?

No -- definitely not. German does not need a helping verb such as ist in the present tense.

It's as useless as if you tried to stuff a helping "do" into the English question: "Does she is drinking?"

Something you might hear from a non-native speaker, but it's not correct at all.

July 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Saxena_Devansh

Why is "Is she drinking" Trinkt sie...where did Ist go?

July 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

where did Ist go?

It's not needed in German.

English needs a helping verb to form the present tense. It's not part of the meaning, just a grammatical word that English grammar requires. German doesn't require this helper.

Similarly with the "do" that English requires in questions and negative sentences but German does not.

July 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AplexNycto

Why does trinket in this sentence come before sie? When the sentence is she drinks. To me the german translates to drink she. Please help.

July 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Diptaraj23

drinking = trinkt she = sie then where is the word for "Is"?

July 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

where is the word for "Is"?

It's not needed in German.

sie trinkt = she is drinking

trinkt sie? = is she drinking?

July 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GauravSawa4

Shouldn't it be 'Trinken Sie?'

July 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Shouldn't it be 'Trinken Sie?'

No -- that would mean "Do you drink?"

sie means "she" has verb forms with -t, as in sie trinkt.

Verb forms with -en as in trinken are for wir (we) or sie (they) or Sie (polite/formal "you").

July 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Saanio

Is she drinking? = Trinkt sie?

I'm confused on the rules for this translation. Why is it not "Ist sie trinkt?" or "Sie Trinkt?"

July 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 157

German doesn’t have a progressive (a form equivalent to English “to be …-ing”). We just use present tense and let context decide whether the action happens right now or habitually.

As for the word order: Yes-no questions start with the conjugated verb in first position. So “Sie trinkt” (she drinks/she is drinking – statement) becomes “Trinkt sie” (does she drink/is she drinking – question). Actually English does the exact same thing, only in English you often have to add a helping verb “to do”: “She drinks → does she drink”. German is simpler here: There’s no need to add any additional helping verbs; just pull the existing one to the front.

Also, in the future please have a quick scan over the sentence discussion section before asking a question; maybe it is already answered there. This way you can help reduce clutter :)

July 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StarBendySUP

Can someone be my teacher other than this APP!

July 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Can someone be my teacher other than this APP!

It's not allowed to share contact details on Duolingo sentence discussions, so you will have to take your search elsewhere.

July 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StarBendySUP

Is she drinking : Trinkt sie (this is for help ) ;)

July 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LizzyLizzards

So... why can't I have "ist" included in the sentence?

July 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

So... why can't I have "ist" included in the sentence?

Because it's not needed in German.

It would be like generalising "English questions require 'do', as in 'do you like cookies?'" and ask "does she is drinking?".

Why can't I have "does" included in the sentence?

Answer: it's not needed in that sentence in English. It's wrong to add it.

July 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Renitharen

Why are they using trinkt for both drinks and for is drinking

July 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Why are they using trinkt for both drinks and for is drinking

Because (standard) German does not make that grammatical distinction and uses the same tense for an action that is taking place right now as for one that takes place regularly or repeatedly.

July 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChaitanyaD814668

Why my answer was not accepted

August 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Why my answer was not accepted

Probably because you made a mistake.

(What was your entire answer?)

August 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HunterRoyc

Why is trinkt first and sie second? And not sie trinkt?

August 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Why is trinkt first and sie second?

Because this is a yes-no question. Those start with the verb.

As in English -- "Is she drinking?" is a yes-no question and starts with the verb "is".

August 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zatara1993

So according to Duolingo... Trinkt sie? is Is she drinking? Trinkt er? is Does he drink? Its not interchangeable. Trinkt sie? IS NOT Does she drink? and Trinkt er? IS NOT Is he drinking? In english these are two different phrases so can someone please elaborate?

August 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna880173

Hi! It actually IS interchangeable in German. In short, English has continuous and simple clauses, German doesn't. German also doesn't need an auxiliary verb in this question. Please quickly read through the discussion, this has already been explained multiple times here. :)

August 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/charlessom7

Is she drinking? And i wrote "ist sie trinkt" but its wrong,how?

August 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/charlessom7

Is she drinking? And i wrote "ist Sie trinkt " but its wrong,how?

August 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna880173

Sie with a capital S in the middle of a sentence (such as when used as a subject in a question) is not "she", it's the formal "you", similar to "vous" in French. About the "Ist sie trinkt?" option: "Is she drinks" makes no sense and this forum already has a dozen explanation as to why. In short: German has only one present tense, which is the equivalent of the English present simple. So no continuous tenses. Please look through the answers already here to find a more detailed explanation.

August 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JameliaBrooks

why is it trinkt sie

August 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DrBrain2

So I never covered questions in the basics. Not sure why it's showing up in a strengthen exercise

August 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod

    Duolingo adds in extra sentences in the strengthening exercises. Repeating exactly the same sentences isn't the only way to strengthen your language skills.

    August 28, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/morganrc42

    Yes, but his confusion was that it added a whole new concept (the different ordering of question sentences) that isn't covered in the lower level basics at all; it's brand new and not covered in the basic notes.

    October 27, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaka221018

    Why is "ist sie trinkt"wrong and Trinkt sie " correct

    April 8, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Girlcatlove1524

    That is wrong because the verb trinken translates to 'is drinking'. Since the verb already includes 'is', then we don't add ist to the question c:

    January 6, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NikitaTalele

    Ist sie Trink. should be the right answer.

    April 23, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Eh? No, that is not correct German at all.

    April 23, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lopa162665

    why trinkt sie? where is?

    May 5, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Where is what?

    May 5, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbhishekBa975553

    Why this is not start with ist

    May 29, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Because the "is" is not a main verb in the English sentence -- it's just a helping verb to form the present continuous tense of the verb "drink".

    So you have to translate not "is" by itself, but the whole verb form "is drinking" -- which is trinkt in German, because German doesn't have a present continuous tense, so you translate with the German present tense.

    May 29, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nottamused

    couldnt it be 'Sie ist trinkt (or trinkst [whichever would work better])?

    May 31, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    No, it could not.

    German doesn't have a continuous aspect formed with "to be" and an -ing form of the verb like English does.

    Translate the present continuous form "is drinking" into the German present tense trinkt.

    May 31, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tal664838

    Why not "ist sie trinkt"?

    June 15, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Because we don't use "to be" like that in German.

    June 15, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lory56512

    I am confused. The question in English is "Is she drinking" but in German, the "is" goes away and its just "she drinking". Im sorry i really don't understand

    June 29, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    You can't translate word for word, because the grammars of the two languages are different.

    "is" doesn't have a meaning of its own in this sentence -- it's just a helping verb to form the present continuous tense of "drink", "is drinking".

    It's the entire verb form "is drinking" that you have to translate into German.

    German doesn't have separate present continuous and present simple tenses -- it just has one present tense.

    So the translation of "(she) is drinking" and "(she) drink" are the same: (sie) trinkt.

    And to make it a question, you put the verb first -- thus Trinkt sie? can mean "Does she drink?" or "Is she drinking?".

    June 30, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Henry264662

    I feel like that last example, the interchangeability of "does she drink" and "is she drinking", would lead to some confusion with the intent of the question though, wouldnt it? Thats where my personal confusion is rooted.

    July 2, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    In practice, there is no confusion, as usually only one of those will make sense in any real situation.

    July 2, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frodo38267

    Is sjhe drinking shd be ist sie trinkt

    August 14, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 157

    No. German doesn’t have a dedicated progressive form (one which corresponds to English “to be …-ing”). We just use normal present tense and let context determine whether the action happens right now or regularly.

    August 15, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dev933480

    Doesn't make sense.....

    October 3, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Girlcatlove1524

    What questions do you have? I'll be happy to help! :D

    January 6, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MutasimFua

    Why "Ist sie trinkt?" wrong

    November 28, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 157

    Because German (Standard German at least) doesn’t have an equivalent to the English progressive (the “to be …-ing” form). We just use normal present tense. If you really really need to stress that something is happening in that very moment, you can add an adverb such as gerade “right now”. But in many cases that’s not necessary.

    November 28, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShamAl-Ali

    why ist sie trinket wrong?

    December 31, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 157

    Confer multiple answers to earlier questions (such as my own to MutasimFua’s and Frodo38267’s questions).

    December 31, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dr.Jay7

    Why is "Is she drinking?" "Trinkt sie?" not "Es sie trinkt?" It's very confusing.

    January 6, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    German does not need a helping verb such as “is” in the present tense.

    “Is drinking” translates to trinkt.

    January 6, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emily543898

    So im have trouble know when trinkt should go first

    January 29, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    In yes-no questions, the verb goes first.

    She is drinking. = Sie trinkt. (Statement. Verb in second position.)

    Is she drinking? = Trinkt sie? (Question. Verb goes first.)

    January 29, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClarkHayde

    I'm so confused. Please someone explain why it is "Trinkt sie?". Doesn't that just translate to "Is drinking she"? Shouldn't it be "Ist Sie trinkt?". Ist=is, Sie=she, trinkt=drinking.

    March 8, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 157

    No, you can’t always translate word for word – in fact for all but the most basic sentences you usually can’t. In this case, the problem is that German doesn’t have a dedicated progressive (“to be x-ing”) form. We just use plain present tense and judge by context whether the action is happening right now or habitually. In other words “Sie trinkt” could be either “she drinks” or “she is drinking”.

    Also, please have a quick scan over the discussion section to see if your question has already been answered to help reduce cluttering.

    March 8, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sam359128

    Why wouldn't it be ist sie trinkit tho

    April 2, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    No. German doesn't need a helping verb for the present tense. Just Trinkt sie? is enough.

    April 3, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/evangelynn329208

    Why is it when it say "she is drinking" it put's it as trinkt sie ? It confuses me when it flips the words

    April 5, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 157

    “She is drinking” is “Sie trinkt”. It’s the question “is she drinking” where the verb gets moved to the beginning (as it is in English, only in German every verb can move there, not just auxiliaries).

    April 5, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lolormhcom

    Okay i can't understand stand why does " Is she drinking " Is " Trinkt sie " I thought it's " Ist sie trinkt " ?? Someone please explain):

    August 4, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Girlcatlove1524

    In German the verbs include 'is'. For example, the verb 'trinken' means 'is drinking', therefore we don't have to use 'ist' :)

    August 4, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 157

    Or to phrase it a different way: German doesn’t have an equivalent to the English progressive (the “to be …-ing” form). We just use present tense and let context (or adverbs like gerade “in this moment”) decide whether the action happens right now or regularly.

    Also @lolormhcom, this question has already been answered dozens of times in this very thread. In the future, please have a quick scan over the discussion to see whether your answer is already there. This would be a tremendous help for reducing unnecessary cluttering. Thank you.

    August 5, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShawndaChi

    Why is it said trinkt sie? I thought it would be ist sie trinkt, why is it different in certain sentences?

    August 9, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 157

    Please have a quick scan over the discussion, your question has been answered dozens of times already.

    August 9, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FarahSaghi

    "Ist sie trinkt? " Doesn't work?

    August 15, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    "Ist sie trinkt? " Doesn't work?

    Please read all of the comments on this sentence discussion.

    This question has been asked and answered before.

    August 15, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FarahSaghi

    Ist sie trinkt, how it could be incorrect?

    August 18, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 157

    Please have a quick scan over the discussion section. Your question has been answered dozens of times before.

    August 19, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WyattJoneswppq

    Why not ist sie trinkt

    December 30, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Please read the previous comments on this page.

    December 30, 2017
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