1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: German
  4. >
  5. "This child is you."

"This child is you."

Translation:Dieses Kind bist du.

August 30, 2017

63 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash473779

'This child, you are.'

Just think yoda style and you got it :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marina567436

I am always thinking in yoda style for german


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ProfWhiteDuck88

Always thinking in Yoda style for German, I am


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElnaNaude

Well Professor, that is actually a good summary. Good enough for a lingot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/asdfasdf255457

Das Kind= ist. Why it cannot be "Dieses Kind ist du."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/quis_lib_duo

das Kind is the predicative nominal of the subject you linked by the copula bist. The copula has to accord to the subject, here 2nd pers. sing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/numachi

Why can't the subject be "dieses Kind" rather than "du"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danielle.bowlden

So why isnt that the case in English? Did we just mess it up for so long that the rules changed?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/melanoman

This got set as part of the formation of the English language. It could have gone either way, but now that this way was picked these are two different right answers, one for each language. Fluent English always matches the 1nd/2nd/3rd person of preceding noun to conjugate the copula, but fluent German always picks the lowest numbered person in play, regardless of word order.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eloise23

Now that's fascinating!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eloise23

3 April 2018 - There is no problem with it having the copula. The problem is that the sentence could have either das Kind or du as the subject, each requiring a different conjugation.

I shall report this, as the English sentence is quite clear that the subject is this child/dieses Kind . This child is you is a different sentence from You are this child. Not a big difference in meaning, but the translation is, IMO, valid.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emilio_Spain

I'd say the issue comes with which form is the most natural one in the language at play. For instance, imagine you and your friend are looking at an old album of photos and point at one photo of hers in particular, then in English you would say "This child (in the photo) is you" using the verb in 3rd person referring to "this child", however in Spanish you would say "Esta niña (de la foto) eres tú" using the verb in 2nd person referring to "you". It's just the way it is in the natural native expression. I guess the same happens with German, it must be more natural to express this idea as "dieses Kind bist du" instead of "dieses Kind ist du".

That means, if you were to translate "dieses Kind bist du" into English, you would sound more natural by saying "This child is you", not "this child are you".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chiantiglace

that's what I was thinking myself, although I wonder if "dieses kind ist du" is still understood properly, or it sounds strange to a native german speaker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

I think the Germans understand you, but it sounds strange to them, just as strange as "this child are you" for native English speakers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeltaDry

I think the English literal equivalent (and not the idiomatic translation) to "dieses Kind bist du" would not be "this child are you" but "you are this child" since in German the subject can naturally appear after the verb, or so I believe. "You are this child" still sounds a bit weird, but not as much as "This child are you".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zegrec

akLkaklkakalkakalkakalkakalmLalkaoloakaoalkOKakaakkOkalk?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/englandlej

This makes sense to me....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mstfelq

What's the difference between dies and dieses and dieser? And when do i use them?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ManuelSCz

The cases (and the genres too), that's "the thing" to study in German, a lot to explain to put it here. Google "German Cases". You'll get used to them, just be patient.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zegrec

KalkalllkLkOalakkKalakMalmalkalokOallmKalkakalkahkalkHoLkOkaaokHoLkKLqakoalkLoakaKlakqKoKaoaokakklalOalaoaaokaolalkakalmalkka


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luzreimann

I need help. Dies and diesrs and dieser


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabe96831

Google german cases or read the notes for this lesson on the website. Be patient and you will learn them with time!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/djusen

According to Wiktionary, "dies" is more or less interchangeable with "dieses".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MiguelVida14

I think it is a special case of English, because I made the translation to Spanish and made sense: Este niño eres tú (To be conjugation of "You") Sounds correct. Este niño es tú (To be conjugation of "he/she/it) sounds wrong. Anyway, It would be better to state the sentence: You are this child.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emily459033

Confused because in the English the child is the subject, not you (I think).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianHughe724504

You are this child - Du bist dieses Kind ??????????????????? This child is you - Dieses Kind ist dich ?????????????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DancingGeek

In English, when we change the word order, we change the conjugation. In German, changing the word order for emphasis doesn't change the conjugation.

You are this child - Du bist dieses Kind

This child is you - Dieses Kind bist du.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GhostAlexMercer

"dieses kind ist schnell" is ok but "dieses kind ist du" is wrong? what changed the subject here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DancingGeek

In English we treat the second kind of sentence as having a subject and object, with the word order changing which is which, but in German they are stricter about the verb 'to be' not having an object (both sides are treated as the same thing, the subject of the sentence) and changing word order only changes emphasis. So, "This child is you" becomes "Dieses Kind bist du".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zegrec

LMlamakakaoalMamoalmalolaoMAlmKoamaak


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zegrec

KamaakallMakLmaloalmakalkkaLmKoa


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zegrec

KkalaaKalokaMkal


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zegrec

AkoalmalamlklmamawmaklmmkaMkakoaKAokHa


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zegrec

M:!?9!?:MKkalmooalkamkalamOallaKMaomaOoalkakkaomaoalmakmkalmKoaalmaakkalkmaoalm9!/!!???/:!??!/9::@:!??!/:!!««¿»¿℉¿℉


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CodyBeasen

Why is it not "Dieses Kind ist dich"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eloise23

When you have a sentence in either English or German using a linking verb (copula), both nouns (or the subject noun and the predicate adjective) are in nominative case. Jack is a nurse/ Johann ist eine Krankenschwester. Dich is accusative (direct object) form of du, so it isn't used in a copula.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarolWampl1

In the English sentence you provided, the subject is "this child" (Dieses Kind), the verb is "is" (ist), and the predicate nominative is "you" (du). If you wanted students to respond with "Dieses kind bist du," then the English equivalent would be something like "This child, you are." Or, if German word order for this type of expression is frequently different from English word order, then it would be helpful if this is explained to students. Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KushagraSa7

Why not "Dieses Kind ist dich"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uSDaDEbT

WHAT IS WRONG WITH DIESES KIND IST SIE ??? I KNOW IT'S FORMAL, BUT WHY IS IT WRONG ???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Snarestu

Sie is allowed, but you have to use Sind, not Ist (that's why it was wrong!) Dieses Kind sind Sie


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ProfWhiteDuck88

Oh ok! I had the same question! Thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/petorialc

Why not "Dieses Kind seid ihr"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eloise23

The sentence is referring to only one child, which logically cannot be equated with multiple people. This is a weird sentence, though, so I suppose anything is possible. :-D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scooper286556

The rule is the same in English, but it's a rule most of us ignore most of the time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Korolyeva

Why is 'sein' conjugated for the 2nd person sing if the subject is "This Child"/"Dieses Kind"? The English sentence clearly has "you" as the predicate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

The subject is "du".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

German is not the same as English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelikaku

"Das Kind sind Sie." accepted.

בס״ד


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/embarassingpjs

What's the difference between diese, dieses and dieser


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carlosherreraav

So everything comes down to what language you are using to communicate! Wow.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SushanthNa6

Why Dieses? Why not dies?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnthonyCon902428

I find it very interesting that there is no response from a MOD on this one. I agree with all the English speakers out there, and I think this is needlessly designed to trip people up.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElnaNaude

What a silly statement!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yugo4k

"Dieses Kind sind Sie." was reported as wrong. What would be the correct formal sentence be?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blanquita400779

Why not "dieses Kind ist du"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Niki106262

hmm good explination


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bill763190

Now we got "copula" first i,ve heard that. Every you think you gt it some new fotm shows up. I think sign.language would be easier.

Learn German in just 5 minutes a day. For free.