https://www.duolingo.com/Johan_Fayez

Some pronunciation differences!

Johan_Fayez
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Hey guys! So I just started leaning Swedish from few days and I noticed some things that I can't differentiate between:-

1- Pronunciation of the letter ''K'' and ''S'' in Swedish, well it really confuses me, because sometimes it is pronounced ''Sh'' like:- Nötkött (Notshott), Kött (Shott)

Varsågod (Varshågod), Ursäkta (Orsäkta)

While, sometimes it is pronounced normally ''K'' and "S'' like:- Tallrik, Kniv

Salt, Glass

So, the question here when should I pronounce both "K and S" as "SH" and when normally?

2- Pronunciation of ''RS'', so I noticed that there was a sentence:- "Jag talar svenska" (talar shvenska) and I read on of the comments that ANY "RS" together makes the sound ''SH'', is that right?

3- Pronunciation of "Sk'', sometimes it is pronounced ''KH'' like:- Sked (Khed), Skägg (Khägg), Skämt (khämt)

While sometimes it is pronounced ''Sk'' like:- Skada, Skådespelare, Skadlig

So, the question here when should I pronounce "Sk" as "KH" and when normally?

4- Pronunciation of ''G'', sometimes it is non-pronounced like:-

God Morgon (God Moron), Restaurang (Restauran)

While sometimes it is pronounced normally like:-

Gaffel, Glass

So, the question here when should I pronounce it and when not?

Tack så mycket :)

1 year ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MagnusBoiv
MagnusBoiv
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Soft vowels are: e, i, y, ä, ö

Hard vowels are: a, o, u, å

Many of the letters you mention change the pronunciation based on whether there's a hard or a soft vowel after the letter.

K gets the tj-sound before soft vowels.

SK get the sj-sound before soft vowels

G gets the j-sound before soft vowels.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MagnusBoiv
MagnusBoiv
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There are some exceptions to those rules, mostly recent loan words, like:

keso, kille, kö, skippa, gem, Gittan.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johan_Fayez
Johan_Fayez
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Sorry there was no comment place below, so you said that you have 18 different vowel sounds, how so? Isn't it:- Soft vowels are: e, i, y, ä, ö

Hard vowels are: a, o, u, å ???

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MagnusBoiv
MagnusBoiv
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Yes, but each vowel has a short and a long version, and the versions differ not only by length.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johan_Fayez
Johan_Fayez
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Can you give me some examples if it is not bothering you of course?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MagnusBoiv
MagnusBoiv
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glass (short a), glas (long a)

finn (short i), fin (long i)

kull (short u), kul (long u)

vän (short ä), vän (long ä)

moll (short å), mål (long å)

fett (short e), fet (long e)

Otto (short o), otur (long o)

möss (short ö), mös (long ö)

nyss (short y), nys (long y)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pinnariskogen
pinnariskogen
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Swedish has 17 vowel phonemes since short "ä" and short "e" are basically identical in most dialects.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johan_Fayez
Johan_Fayez
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so, what's the difference between ''Jag'' and "Ja''?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MagnusBoiv
MagnusBoiv
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Yes, but if you count vowel sounds, you might want to add three more, because long Ö, long Ä and short E/Ä are pronounced differently when followed by an R.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pinnariskogen
pinnariskogen
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Not in all dialects, but sure!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johan_Fayez
Johan_Fayez
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Tack så mycket <3 2 lingots

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johan_Fayez
Johan_Fayez
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If so, what's the difference between ''Jag'' and "Ja''? :/

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MagnusBoiv
MagnusBoiv
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In most cases they are pronounces exactly the same. In some situations "jag" can be pronounced with a G-sound in the end, and in some cases "ja" can be pronounced with a short A instead of the standard long A.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johan_Fayez
Johan_Fayez
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Tack så mycket :) <3

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MagnusBoiv
MagnusBoiv
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R+S gets merged to a SH-like sound when they are close together, like within words (Varsågod, Ursäkta) and between words if the words are spoken together (Det ger sig). If you speak so slow that the words are pronounced separately, the R-sound and the S-sound don't change.

I think God Morgon is an exception where we drop the G because it's difficult to pronounce.

Restaurang should be pronounced with a ng-sound in the end, so the G is not dropped there.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Satyameva123
Satyameva123
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Tack så mycket.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IsakNygren1
IsakNygren1
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It's true that rs become sh-sound in Swedish. But Finland Swedish is a complete exception. All other things have already been answered.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Satyameva123
Satyameva123
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Thank you for starting this discussion Shady_Hazem.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johan_Fayez
Johan_Fayez
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Varsågod :)

1 year ago
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