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"Jullie moeten deze kant op!"

Translation:You have to go this way!

11 months ago

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/friswing
friswing
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So the verb GO is not needed in Dutch here?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tkhclio1
tkhclio1
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I'm curious, is there a reason why "You have to come this way!" is not accepted? How would one convey that meaning? Just add "komen"?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
xMerrie
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Exactly! :)

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stuart946486

I took the safe option and put "you have to go this way" (which of course was marked correct), but can this sentence also be used to express "you have to do it this way"? Or to imply a different verb? I notice from other feedback that "come this way" was not accepted - could / should it have been? I see no logical reason why only 'go' can have been implied in this sentence. Any native Dutch speakers able to provide some input?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrandmasterMG

As a native German speaker I assume this is similar to the German 'Sie müssen in diese Richtung' which would be word by word 'You have to in this direction' which is of course not a correct English sentence. The German phrase is used as an answer to a question such as 'In which direction is X?' or 'How do we get to X' In German you can drop the verb go but you don't have to. Dutch speakers, is it the same in Dutch?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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That's right. It's not mandatory to drop the verb.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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"Deze kant op" can only indicate a direction of movement, not a manner in which to do something. It's an example of a postposition, where the preposition is placed after the noun to indicate movement. You will find more of those in this particular lesson.

That is why "go" is the logical action that was omitted.

4 months ago