"My dear girl."

Translation:Minha querida menina.

4 years ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Spinatmaultasche

What is wrong about "Minha menina cara" ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
Danmoller
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It's strange, but we use 'minha cara menina' some times.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deniseo6

Why does the adjective go before the noun in these cases?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
Danmoller
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Each adjective has its best position. Maybe it's based upon the fact that when you put them before, they get a more sentimental meaning, and when they are put after they get a more literal meaning. But not all of them can go in both places.

See:

  • Uma casa nova (better for a house which was recently built)
  • Uma nova casa (better for a home to where you moved recently)

  • Um amigo velho (better for a friend in advanced age)

  • Um velho amigo (better for a friend from old times)

Now, "cara" is written the same way as "cara", that's probably why it has to come before the noun. (Hahaha, I'll explain :p)

Besides "dear", "Caro/Cara" can also mean expensive. Dear is put before the noun, expensive is put after.

Now, I'm not sure if it's the same case as "novo" and "velho", being a single word with meanings changed, or if they are two words indeed.....got some to think about....

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Davu
Davu
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At least in British English, similar to the Portuguese "caro/a", "dear" means both beloved and expensive: "My dear friend, I won't buy it, it is too dear".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JFSPA

Would it be a fair approximation to say, you put the adjective after the noun in cases where, in english, you could also append the phrase, "that is _," "which is" or "who is ___"?

"My friend who is old" (advanced in age) "the house which is new" (newly built) "the friend who is dear" (a bit odd, still works) Does this work more generally, or not?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scutigera
Scutigera
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In my first attempts to learn Portuguese, when I learned that adjectives go after the nouns I started calling my friend, o meu Nuno doce which he liked. I had this sense it was somehow wrong but he never told me. Not till I arrived at Duolingo though did I understand I was basically saying he tastes sweet. G'ah!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JFSPA

The urge of non-PT speakers to use "Minha menina cara" may come from a famous Italian parallel usage, "O mio babbino caro."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JFSPA

It offers "menina" when doing its own translation. It accepts menina, too. But it gives the suggested answer as "minha querida miúda." "Miúda" is now a third word for "girl," as we've also gotten "garota." More to come? More help in differentiating when to use?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carlosjavi476113

Why minha and not meu?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Davu
Davu
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Because "menina" is feminine. See the notes in the "Possessives" skill: https://www.duolingo.com/skill/pt/Possessives

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TomVerhoeve

EDIT: Why isn't "Minha querida filha" okay?

Of course I meant minha and not meu, was in a hurry adn not really looking at what I was writing down now... Question still stands though!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
Paulenrique
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"Meu" is used for masculine words. "Filha" is a feminine word.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LelandSun
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"My dear girl" is not reserved for addressing one's own daughter (filha).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scraff

In the previous question (multiple choice) it gave Querido=Wanted. I have not come across this before. I assume DL forgot it was teaching Querido/a=Dear. But when would you use Querido as Want? I cant find this anywhere.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
Paulenrique
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I've never seen querido as "wanted", at least not as an adjective. Also, its usage as past participle is also rare.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LelandSun
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I too remember seeing that recently. It was a single word "querido", not part of a sentence or a phrase, to be matched to one of three choices, and the correct answer was "wanted".

As Paulenrique alluded to, "querido/a/os/as" are also the past-participle forms of "querer" (to want). We are already familiar with present tense conjugations of this verb: "quero/quer/queremos/querem". Although we haven't yet learned how to use past participles, I guess it is apropos, as we learn "queried/a" to mean "dear", that we keep in mind the word has another meaning as well.

I expected, scraff, that you looked up "querido/a" in a dictionary and did not find a meaning of "wanted" listed, as is the case with https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/portuguese-english/querido. Well, that is the way it is with traditional dictionaries -- they list regular verbs only in their infinitive forms. It is expected that a user can deal with the conjugations independently from using the dictionary. If the word didn't have an alternate meaning of "dear", "querido/a" wouldn't have an entry at all. That puts a great disadvantage on us new learners of a language.

Now we have a different kind of dictionary at our disposal. If you looked up "querido" on https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/querido#Portuguese, you will find that it is the past participle of "querer", with a hyperlink to that entry, where you can expand its complete conjugation table. Well, that is the idea anyway. Because it is a user-contributed wiki, Wiktionary is a work in progress. Although it is getting better day by day, these useful cross-references are not complete, and you might encounter a gap now and then. It is nevertheless a worthwhile learning tool. First-time users might be startled at its unique multi-language format, but it is not hard to get used to.

Following are a couple examples from Duo exercises of how "querido" is used to mean "wanted": (I think they come up only for Portuguese speakers learning English. I found them using a search.)

"Nós temos querido beber aquele vinho." (We have wanted to drink that wine.)
"Ele tem querido nadar." (He has wanted to swim.)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scraff

Thank you for your answer. Have a lingot! I have never looked up a word on Wiki before, never crossed my mind. I will do in future, however! Great to know. =]

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scutigera
Scutigera
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Linguee is also great for looking up conjugated verbs:

https://www.linguee.com/portuguese-english/translation/querido.html

I am so happy it exists! :)

10 months ago
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