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"Weten jullie waar mijn huis is?"

Translation:Do you know where my house is?

11 months ago

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Nathan.Chan

Could/should you say "Weten jullie waar mijn huis staat?"

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JordanSchutten
JordanSchutten
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Yes. It seems as though in this course, zijn, zitten, and staten are interchangeable.

Correct me if I'm wrong.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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That's incorrect. They are usually not interchangeable. More info here: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/5785064

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Piers.h4

When can one use 'Kennen jullie waar mijn huis is?''

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ly_Mar
Ly_Mar
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Kennen’ doesn't work here. While both ‘weten’ and ‘kennen’ translate to ‘to know’ they don't by any means mean the same thing. If you are familiar with any romance language, it's the same distinction that those make, generally using a verb coming from ‘cognōsco’ (FR: ‘connaitre’, IT: ‘conoscere’, SP: ‘conocer’) for ‘kennen’ and a verb coming from ‘sapio’ (FR: ‘savoir’, IT: ‘sapere’, SP: ‘saber’) for ‘weten’. The difference is:

  • Kennen’ means ‘to know’ in the sense of ‘to be acquainted/familiar with’, which means you will find it used for people or objects (physical or abstract that they may be). This is how you ‘know’, for example: a friend, a dog, a name, the consequences of something, the alphabet.

  • Weten’ means to know referring properly to information, knowledge, which results in it being used mostly with subordinate clauses rather than with direct objects. You can know: how it is, why he's here, where they are, who she is, what his name is. This is also how you ‘know’ that this is true or how you don't ‘know’ whether they'll show up.

The practical approach is: if it has a noun as a direct object, it's ‘kennen’; if it introduces an indirect question, ‘that’ or ‘whether/if’, it's most certainly ‘weten’. Pronouns can go with both, look for what they are replacing.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NCThom
NCThom
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Ik weet waar zijn huis is. Ik ken de route naar zijn huis omdat ik er vaak heb gefietst.

3 weeks ago