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"Jullie moeten nog een datum afspreken."

Translation:You still have to agree on a date.

1 year ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/pattipl
pattipl
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Does the placement of 'nog' influence whether it means 'you still have to agree on a date' vs 'you must agree on another date'?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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No, the placement would be the same. This is the only place it could go, in fact.

So yes, the sentence is ambiguous.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
xMerrie
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The emphasis of "nog" might give it away though!

If the empahsis of the whole sentence is on 'nog', it means "you must agree on another date". If the emphasis is on any other part of the sentence, it means "you still have to agree on a date".

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beloeng
beloengPlus
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Wonder about this as well.. :)

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tina_in_Bristol
Tina_in_Bristol
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In UK English, just as in the original Dutch, it's fine to use "agree" as a transitive verb (without a preposition), so you can "agree a date", or "agree a venue"; you don't have to agree ON or TO them. I believe this is less common in the U.S.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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I've watched so much UK TV I'm half British by osmosis and I've never heard "agree" being used this way, although it's easy to find citations for it. Is it limited to certain areas?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Feetunes

It's not that common in conversational UK English to be honest. Could say "Can we agree a date", but as, or possibly more, likely to say "agree on a date". Probably used more in the past tense I would suggest: "They/we agreed a date". Like Tina says, it's used, but no, not particularly on a regional basis.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jhalasha

Is "You have yet to agree on a date" a valid translation ?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vickihart197

I said "You must yet agree on a date" and was marked wrong. I think "You must still agree on a date" is more commonly used, but isn't "yet" still a valid translation?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Feetunes

Also technically correct English vicki, though "must yet" feels a lot less natural. The most usual format would be: "you still have to agree on a date".

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Feetunes

Yes, Jhalasha. At least it's correct English. Using "yet" instead of "still" is a bit more formal though.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KateHoyle

What about, "You still have to fix a date." This is common in British English.

2 months ago