https://www.duolingo.com/ikaij

What to do?

Hello everyone, I'm in doubt what to learn next. As you can see, i'm currently at level 7 at German, but the only reason it is just level 7 is that i'm lazy. I'm learning German for 5 years at school, so i think i'm better than level 7. :)

But, i think German is not language for me. I just don't like it so much. Hate that grammar and these long words. I like it how it sounds when someone speaking, but i think generally, it isn't for me.

I'm native Serbian/Croatian speaker, but i understand English perfectly. I want to start learning other language, but don't know which one. I always liked Nordic countries, so these languages are maybe option for me.

I'm not interested in French. Spanish looks easy for me, because i watched so many Spanish movies, and I already know some things at Spanish. But i don't want to start with Spanish, there is many reasons. :)

What you think about Nordic languages (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish), Italian, Dutch? These are options for me, I think. Or, to continue learning German? If you have any advice for me, i would be very grateful. What is the best option for native Serbian/Croatian speaker with good English knowledge? In fact, i have so many questions.. Please help me. :)

September 2, 2017

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Koezumi
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Hello, I'm not sure to be that helpful as a French native speaker but I have learned Dutch during my schooling and as a Belgian I face it everyday, one thing is sure : it is the closer language to German. I don't think you will have difficulties to learn it because it is much simpler : no real declensions, an easy grammar, a lot of words are similar in French/ English or German. I find it more softly spoken by us Belgian because we don't stress that much the "g" sound as the Dutch.

If you're not interested in French I don't think going with Italian will be a good thing because they are very close. I never learned it however I can understand a lot of things just because of the similiraties. You should consider Romanian, it's a Romance language but to me it is more like a mix of Romance and Slavic language.

Therefore, you seem really enjoyed by the fact of learning a Nordic language so why not giving it a shot ? Swedish and Norwegian are well intelligibles between them, as I've heard while they're speaking to each other with their own language, Swedish and Norwegian people can understand what the other say, Danish however seems different and more difficult.

Maybe you should make a list of what you're interested the most in learning a new language. It's an idea.

Good luck !

September 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ikaij

Thank you for reply! At this moment i'm not interested in Romanian. I have no where to use it, to be honest. What you think what is best option between Swedish and Norwegian? I know there are a lot of similarities, but thats the biggest reason i don't know what to choose.

To be honest with you, many people here from Balkans going to live and work in Germany, so definitely German is most important second-language for us on Balkans (thats the reason we learning German it at elementary and high school).

Nordic languages is so hard to pronounce, or i just think it? What about grammar in Swedish/Norwegian?

September 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Koezumi
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I think Danish is the hardest nordic language because of the pronunciation, for example "Hej" which means "Hi" is pronounced "Haij" but in Swedish it is pronounced "Hej" and in Norwegian it is written "Hei" but pronounced almost like the Danish "Haij" .

I think you'd better learn Norwegian (Bokmal is the more used) because you'll be able to understand more easily the other Nordic languages than a Swede. Here you can see what I mean in more details: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_Norwegian_Bokm%C3%A5l_and_Standard_Danish

German is an important language but I think you don't have to force yourself to learn it if you don't want to. It's all up to you.

September 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Far-quaad
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Hello! I am a native English speaker, from the USA. As far as the germanic languages, I think German and English would be the hardest. German for plenty of obvious reasons and English for the immense amount of homophones (words that sound alike, but where different spellings have different meanings. eg. Jim and Gym, bare and bear, be and bee, or two, too, and to) With the background that you have in Germanic languages another west Germanic language, like Dutch would probably be very easy in comparison to German. As far as nordic languages go, I find the easiest to be Norwegian or Swedish, Danish seems quite hard in comparison to those.

As for the romance languages, French has the most shared vocabulary with English but is probably the hardest in it's family (in my opinion) Spanish and Italian are easy to pronounce once you learn the rules.

You should learn whichever language you find the most enjoyable, but the only way to find that out is to expose yourself to all of them. Duo has an option to delete courses, so if you want you could do what I did and try them all!

September 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ikaij

Thank you for reply! As i say in previous post reply, German is very important here on Balkans because many peoples go to live and work in Germany when finish with school. But, i got tired of German. What you would chose between Norwegian and Swedish? I think French is so, so so hard to pronounce, so deffinitely it's not option. Spanish and Italian are easy to pronounce, i agree with you, but i don't have so much opportunites to speak Spanish and Italian, like i have with German.

September 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Far-quaad
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Personally, I like Norwegian, but Swedish is more widely spoken, so one would have twice as many people to practice with. Also the Swedish course has cool sentences like "Nittiotalet ringde och ville ha tillbaka sin skjorta" Which in English means, "The nineties called and wanted it's shirt back"

September 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Espiraden

If you feel like you would enjoy learning Danish/Swedish/Swedish more than you do learning German, i say go for it!

September 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ikaij

Thanks for reply. Definitely, learning German is not enjoyable ant that is the real problem. :)

September 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ikaij

What about similarities between Dutch and English? Anyone know?

September 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/DickStada
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A lot of words are similar. But Dutch sentences have often different structure. Dutch is close to English but not about the same. Maybe the best way for you is to start and do some lessons. It is not a shame to stop in case you don't like it.

September 3, 2017
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