"Ik wil niet dat je mij duwt."

Translation:I do not want you to push me.

1 year ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/LalitMahap
LalitMahap
  • 23
  • 13
  • 465

How to identify duwt and doet in speech?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Judi.MD

Phonetically, oe is a simple vowel; that is, it has a single sound, as in the English word 'too'. By contrast, uw is a diphthong; that is, it starts with one sound and ends with another. In this case, the 'slide' is formed by rounding the lips during the utterance. The phonetic samples of these two words that are found at Wiktionary.com may be helpful.

Personally, I find the many diphthongs to be the most challenging thing about speaking and understanding Dutch, and not the grammar. American English has very few sliding vowels by comparison and I was taught not to slide vowels when speaking properly. I find it a difficult habit to break, but break it I must.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pattipl
pattipl
  • 24
  • 23
  • 2
  • 681

Why is 'dat' needed? I would think that 'Ik wil niet je mij duwt' would mean the same thing. Thanks!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phb2013
phb2013
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 16
  • 12
  • 11
  • 1727

I don't know how to explain it grammatically, but if you take "Ik wil niet" and ask the question "Wat wil ik niet" then the answer might sound more natural - "dat je mij duwt" or "that you push me". I think you could also say "Ik wil dat je mij niet duwt".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Annerhea
Annerhea
  • 22
  • 20
  • 18
  • 14
  • 14
  • 9
  • 5
  • 3

That would make " I don't want you push me" - you can see that there is something wrong with that, can't you?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dirk_Galloway

I can, but I don't see how adding 'dat' would provide the 'to' needed in english

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ly_Mar
Ly_Mar
  • 21
  • 16
  • 14
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • 40

It doesn't provide the ‘to’: as you can see, in English ‘push’ stays unconjugated, in the infinitive (‘to push’), while Dutch uses a finite form (‘duwt’). It is a completely different grammatical structure to express the same thing, one that would correspond to a (hypothetical) English ‘I don't want that you push me’.

Using an infinitive structure is simply ungrammatical for this kind of expression in Dutch—if it weren't, the sentence would be ‘ik wil je mij niet duwen’, without any ‘to/te’ because, contrary to English, in Dutch ‘to want/willen’ as an auxiliary verb requires the bare infinitive. The reason why this sentence is ungrammatical is that in Dutch (as in English, for the most part) infinitive constructions (with or without ‘te’) presume the subject to be the same as the main clause, for example: ‘I hope to become rich / ik hoop rijk te worden’ = ‘I hope that I become rich’. English allows you to specify another subject, but many other languages—to my knowledge, practically all other European languages—don't, so you have to express it with a noun clause.

Sorry for the very long explanation, I thought you might be interested in the details.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
xMerrie
Mod
  • 25
  • 20
  • 18
  • 17
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 6

In English, you can drop "that" in this sentence; in Dutch, you can't.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WafelJongen
WafelJongen
  • 15
  • 14
  • 8
  • 234

This structure leads me to expect a subjunctive in the sentence's latter half. Is "duwt" a subjunctive? Or does Dutch even use the subjunctive?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
Mod
  • 19
  • 12
  • 11
  • 9

No, Dutch doesn't use the subjunctive (any more).

5 months ago
Learn Dutch in just 5 minutes a day. For free.