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  5. "Il marche rapidement."

"Il marche rapidement."

Translation:He walks quickly.

March 11, 2013

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Coru

would "il marche vite" also be acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rubenduburck

swiftly is in the translation but not accepted as an answer..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannewjoannew

I've had that issue with other words - usually I just go with the first or the simplest translation : )


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael_Edwin

"Ils marchent rapidement" Isn't this correct? My understanding is that the singular and plural forms sound the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cami841345

It should be marked as right, since there is no pronunciation difference, and no context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheWiseTurtle

What? Wouldn't he he quickly walks be correct also?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeaWolven

hmmm, To me that sounds a bit awkward in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/apawari

when is marche walks and when is it works? would he works quickly be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

No, because marcher isn't used for 'work' by people, but by objects, to describe that they are functioning. So (and I haven't tried this), 'it is working fast' or 'it is running fast' might be a potential translation, but for people you use travailler


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/5004cupcake

Works has an accent on the final e


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PakPolyGlot

First thing that came to my mind reading this sentence was the vampires of Twilight Saga


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alicia504985

Could "it works quickly" an acceptable translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jazzminovitch

I tried that, but it was not accepted. I do not understand why not, but I would appreciate knowing why it is not correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elizabeths552918

Why not Il se promene


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

se promener is used for the action of taking or going for a walk, when you're talking about the actual physical action of walking itself, putting one foot in front of the other, then 'marcher' is used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosephDjac2

Couldn't this also mean "it is working quickly?"

Example: "Le medicament marche-t-il? Oui, il marche rapidement?"

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