https://www.duolingo.com/loresayer

pies vs. pierogi

When I listen closely to the recording for pies (dog), it sounds like the woman is saying "yes" in English. Does that mean pi is pronounced like a y?

This surprised me as I've heard the word pierogi (dumplings) said before, and I've always heard it starting with a p sound not the y sound. Is this correct?

September 4, 2017

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/PVLSANS

Everything correct what I read so far in the comments from my point of view. I just want to add that the recordings have to be understood as a nice offer rather than to be used as main guide in pronounciation issues. Preferably use youtube videos or podcasts. Podcasts are even available to download on your cell phone for free.
Also for other words I heard weird or misleading pronounciation. It was first here on duolingo when I heard the word "chłopiec" pronounced and for me, duolingo pronounces [khwopjets] instead of the correct [xwopjets]. I was really surprised that there was still a language with such an archaic pronounciation which I know from Ancient Greek mostly, until I learnt that this was fake news. Big deception!

September 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/KVRMx

This is all really good to know -- I'm glad I clicked onto this discussion.

September 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mihxal

Both words start with 'p'.

September 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/niskigwun

When an i is followed by another vowel is becomes more like an English "y" is pronounced together with the second vowel. So "pies" is pronounced like "yes" but with a p in front of it.

September 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/KVRMx

Hm. Interesting. Thanks : )

September 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Pan.Daniel

Some of the best descriptions I ever read about the Polish sound are here by Grzegorz Jagodziński. Sorry if you've already seen this website, I really admire this man and his work.

September 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/KVRMx

Thanks Pan Dan. That's helpful : )

September 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Ister14

Also the p in this case is somewhat softened. The sound is a bit like in English 'pee'. It is the same in both pies and pierogi.

September 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Barteczek13

No, in Polish you read every single letter so recording is wrong or you hear wrong (exception - oryginalny we read like orginalny; without "Y"). EDIT: There are digraphs too and you don't read them like differents letters - "cz" "sz" "rz" "dz" "dź" "dż" "ch"

September 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Pan.Daniel

Earlier on this course I read about pięćdziesiąt, sześćdziesiąt, dziewięćdziesiąt - as rare words pronounced without the ć. I told my Polish tutor, who chuckled because they never give it any thought :-)

September 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/sylwuskak

It's really funny that your tutor haven't realised this earlier. Because I (as a Polish native speaker) was learning about this rule in a primary school ;)

September 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Pan.Daniel

That's not all. The same tutor told me they'd only recently noticed how the genitive plural is used with numbers 5+ (except compound numbers that end in 2,3,4). I wonder how many classes they dozed through! Perhaps I should think about a new tutor!? :/

September 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/sylwuskak

Ok, this I can understand because for a native Polish speaker it is just natural. So no one thinks about rules. But I'm suprise about this missing 'ć' because it's classic example when something is pronounced in a different way. Another classic example is "jabłko" which is pronounced like "japko".

By the way, why do you learn Polish? I ask just because I'm interested :)

September 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Pan.Daniel

I moved to Poland this year :-) and I'll be staying here for a long time.
I've always been interested in languages though. I did a bit of travelling and always learned some local lingo.

September 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/sylwuskak

It's interesting ;) So it's should be easier for you to learn Polish if you are in Poland and the language is everywhere. I have a lot of Polish ebooks (also some books for children which may be quiet easy). If you would like, I could send you some :)

September 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Pan.Daniel

Thanks so much for the offer of the ebooks. I've collected a few books since arriving here, I picked up a few on my last visit to Kraków. I've probably got enough to last me awhile, but thanks again for the kind offer. I really hope I'll get better at Polish soon, now that I'm living here. I met someone the other day, they've been in Poland for just over a year and they're speaking Polish really well.

September 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/chartsman

I always pronounce the "y" in the word "oryginalny" and find it sloppy to omit it.

September 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/KVRMx

Hmmm? What I hear is : " pee- ez" or "pee- es" for the Polish word: pies.

September 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Pan.Daniel

I hear the same as you on the course audio, pies should be one syllable.

September 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Ister14

Indeed. When 'i' is used to soften the preceding consonant it is not used (counted) as a base for a syllable. Thus pies is just one syllable and its pronunciation should be very short.

September 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/arienrhod1

It's probably the issue with the recording itself, or maybe the microphone that was used? I noticed this happens a lot to the words starting with the "p" and "f" sound when I was recording some Polish words for https://pl.forvo.com/ (good resource to check pronunciation of words in a language you're learning btw). The inbuilt recording software seemed to not catch the initial "p" and "f" sounds sometimes, no matter how clearly I tried to pronounce it. I since then learned to start recording, then take a slow deep breath before speaking, instead of speaking immediately. If there's a small delay it works correctly.

September 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Enzfj2
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When b, p, f, w, m are followed by i+another vowel, not only the consonants are softened, but also the vowels are slightly iotified. The p sound is voiceless, so you can hear the iotation ('y' sound) more clearly

September 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/GresoTheGropaga

Aww shite, the recording has the first phone missing. It is pronounced normally, with a palatalised 'p'.

October 29, 2017
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