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"Ano, ahoj!"

Translation:Yes, hi!

1 year ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/KaiMyuko
KaiMyuko
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i will now think about pirate stereotypes in children's programming whenever i greet someone in czech

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blaze215988

Not going to lie thats how i figured out it meant hi lol

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/David_Sarif

Yes. Ahoj means "Ad honorem Jesu".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/garpike
garpike
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That sounds very fanciful and unlikely. Wiktionary gives 'ahoj' 'from English ahoy', which itself is just a + 'hoy' (described by the OED as 'a natural exclamation'').

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/garpike
garpike
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That is interesting, thank you (although I note the lack of any citations); however, 'ahoj' was very much a preëxisting word, so it doesn't and didn't stand for any of those things by dint of etymology, which is what I understood David_Sarif's comment to mean.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/james.niederle
james.niederle
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https://www.duolingo.com/Randonneur3
Randonneur3
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About tremas in English. You may be starting a trend. Though personally the hyphen is my favourite key online, partly because it is in the lower ascii set and immune to maltreatment. We see Noël in English, but it is a French word. (Hello everyone, I am new here.)

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/garpike
garpike
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@Kiryo I see diaereses all the time in New York Times online articles, for example (a pretty major paper), and I've always written them in longhand. I'll only type them on a keyboard that supports them without a great deal of fuss, however (like this international one). Hyphens are so much less elegant.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kiryo
Kiryo
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Wow, do you use tremas in English? I thought this practice was all but dead.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnFKoen
JohnFKoen
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Is "ahoj" closer to "hi" in English than "dobrý den" which I would think is more of a "hello" than "hi" (slightly less informal)?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MojeMaliko
MojeMaliko
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"Dobrý den" is very formal, usually used to greet not really known people - at work etc. (= the people, with whom you use "vykání") "Ahoj" (or "Čau" or "Čus" or "Nazdar" or "Zdar") is here to greet the close ones - family, friends etc. (= the people, with whom you use "tykání")

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PapaSmurf88
PapaSmurf88
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Ahoj matey!

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OliverRees6

Why not hello, goodbye?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hugo647250
Hugo647250
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In context "ahoj" can mean either hello or goodbye - it's a greeting upon meeting and upon parting (informally).

2 months ago

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