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"Dobrý den."

Translation:Hello.

1 year ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Speir_
Speir_
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The course appears to be organized and everything is introduced very clearly in the tips and notes. Do "dobrý" and "den" mean different things on their own, or is it just one word in two parts, sort of like the English "By the way" - each of the words in it is a different word, but the whole thing translates differently?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanLyko
JanLyko
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It is exactly like the English "Good morning" or "Good afternoon", as "dobrý" = "good" and "den" = "day" (which covers both "morning" AND "afternoon"). The same applies for German "Guten Tag".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Speir_
Speir_
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Thanks!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Spangsdorf

In fact several languages follow this practice by saying "good" and then "day" as a general greeting: In German "Guten Tag", in Danish "goddag", in French "bonjour" etc. And can't you also in English say "good day" to something as a greeting (a tad old-fashioned, maybe)?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/machtibor

G'day is perfectly good Aussie English :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Speir_
Speir_
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Yep, "good day" is common in English. In Swedish, "god morgon" also means good morning and follows the same practice by saying "good" and "day" afterwards, and it's used when greeting someone.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BilingualQuebecr
BilingualQuebecrPlus
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In the Ottawa Valley some folks say Gidday.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeremiahBr14

Thanks for the explanation. If that's the case, can the definition be broken out into two words? When moving the cursor over the phrase, the definition displayed is the same for each word.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cosmo-pedant
cosmo-pedant
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It does so - - if you scroll down to the arrow part in that "hover definition".

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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I wrote literally "good day" to see if it is accepted, it was. So, it's more "good morning"? The hint, when hovering, gives "good morning/good afternoon". So I don't understand.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lewis150649

What about rano

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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dobré ráno: I think it means good morning.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarlosLeye1

So this is similar to the Russian Good Day?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VladaFu
VladaFu
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Yes, like добрый день (dóbryj denʹ) in Russian and similarly in many other languages.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/machtibor

I think English is actually an exception here, most other languages tend to have a natural option to say "good day" (buenos dias, bom dia, buongiorno, guten Tag,...) instead of necessarily having to specify the time of the day (Australian English has that too with g'day).

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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I don't think English is an exception. The languages you mention "buenos dias, etc..) have both, a general "good day" and a way to specify the time of the day.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paulovictormc

In portuguese we "bom dia", "boa tarde" (used for the period of time between 12pm until 6pm) and "boa noite" (used either for introducing yourself or saying goodbye).

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paulovictormc

We don't have officially a "good morning", btw, it'd be in portguese "boa manhã".

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lolaomar5

just like in russian

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/I2cGAc67
I2cGAc67
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But it seems to mean "good day" and can be used, apparently, either in the morning or afternoon. So why say it means "good morning" when it really means "good day"?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/machtibor

"Good day" is not very common in English (apart from the Australian g'day) but I think it really would be better to translate it literally. But I think that for example the Spanish and the Portuguese Duolingo courses also translate "buenos dias" and "bom dia" as "good morning".

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KonradKond8

Dobrý den! Is very similar to polish Dzień dobry!

1 month ago

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