"Matěji, vy jste dobrý přítel."

Translation:Matěj, you are a good friend.

September 6, 2017

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ccoppage

It might make more sense to use the "ty" form, considering the speaker and Matěj are přátelé.

September 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kacenka9

"ty" form is accepted as well but to a native czech speaker this does not sound weird at all. The formal/informal addressing has many layers and it is common to call somebody by their first name yet use the "vy" form. Typical for colleagues at work for example.

September 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

but why would friends address each other formally?

September 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/drvno

The speaker merely states a fact. Maybe they are just colleagues with Matěj and the latter showed that he is somebody else's good friend prior to this conclusion.

September 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

OK, so normally, friends wouldn't address each other formally, in Czech, even though the vocative case is used? Am I understanding this properly? So if Matěj is the speaker's friend, the sentence would be, "Matěji, ty jsi dobrý přitel," correct?

BTW, this is so similar to Ukrainian!

Matvíju, vy/ty [je] dobryj pryjatel'.

Матвію, ви/ти [є] добрий приятель.

September 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seastar504502

Since when is Matej Mateji? I don't get it.

November 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

When you're addressing him directly, you use the vocative case. It's strange for English speakers because it doesn't exist in English.

November 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dudeitszack

How is a pritel different than a kamrad?

August 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

Přítel means often "boyfriend" if a lady or woman says that about a man.

Kamarád means now just a friend, used to be (and maybe it still to some extent is) more colloquial than přítel, and used to be used especially in certain contexts say 100 years ago, but is now often used instead of přítel when a confusion with the "boyfriend" meaning is to be avoided.

August 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Helen346237

I am having a lot of trouble trying to pronounce přítel. When ř is in Kateřina, it sounds like a r followed by zh. But when I listen to přítel, it sounds like pleetel, only not quite. I'm not hearing the zh at all.

December 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

There is no zh, it is a special single sound. Check the introductory Tips and notes and there are also some tutorials for pronunciation on Youtube.

There are two Ř sounds, one is voiced and one is unvoiced. Kateřina has the former one, přítel has the latter.

December 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

To my ears, it can sound either as "rzh" voiced or "shr" unvoiced. That's how my brain processes it.

December 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Helen346237

Thank you both VladaFu and va-diim. That does help, to know that the consonant sounds different because it is unvoiced. I looked on Youtube and I was surprised and pleased to see that there are several videos entirely dedicated to pronouncing that sound! I can at least roll my rs, so I will practise.

December 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KENNETHGBU

I realize there was not a question mark, but don't you say it the same way whether a question or a statement?

May 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

I do not understand the implication. Yes, such a question is possible, even-though somewhat strange. But why do you ask?

May 27, 2019
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