"Kdo hledá tu velkou krávu a toho velkého vlka?"

Translation:Who is looking for the big cow and the big wolf?

September 7, 2017

19 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhilCostin

I thought it said "Who is searching for that old cow and that big wolf?" I was thinking it meant Little Red Riding Hood!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanLyko

It would be very impolite for Little Red's grandma. "Velkého/velkou/velkého" is accusative of "velký/velká/velké" (big).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhilCostin

Thanks for the extra clarification :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leo_Alshafei

Brilliant! If there is an inanimate in that sentence, it would have been an exercise for the whole lessons.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samerickson89

Is it necessary to say "the wolf" instead of "wolf"? I know in English you're technically supposed to use separate articles for separate objects, but that rule is commonly ignored.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

While Czech does not have articles, the demonstrative pronouns serve that purpose. Since the Czech sentence contains forms of ten modifying both nouns, it is best to use "the" before each of them. Translations that do not are not currently accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

I don't understand what you mean by "in English you're technically supposed to use separate articles for separate objects" ?

As a professor of writing in English, I am unaware of that "technical rule."

Are you saying that OK English (the rule in its commonly ignored form) would be: "Who is looking for big cow and the big wolf?" Or, "Who is looking for a big cow and the big wolf?"
Those sentences are not good English.
Can you give sentences, and/or a reference, supporting your comment?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samerickson89

Sorry, I can see how my wording may have been a bit vague. What I mean is that a phrase like "the TV and radio" implies a single object that functions as both a TV and a radio (or at least leaves unclear whether they are a single or separate objects), while "the TV and the radio" makes it clear that they are separate objects.

When I said "separate" articles, I meant it in the sense that they are distinct from one another, not that they should be different articles.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BernieKlep

Why the big cow and not a big cow?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nueby

From this very same discussion (consider reading before asking already answered questions):

While Czech does not have articles, the demonstrative pronouns serve that purpose. Since the Czech sentence contains forms of ten modifying both nouns, it is best to use "the" before each of them. Translations that do not are not currently accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samerickson89

There's a similar rule in English, although it's rarely followed. For example, saying, "the TV and radio," implies that one object serves both functions. To specify that they're separate objects, one should say, "the TV and the radio."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

Hmm. To attempt to avoid confusing other, especially ESL, users, I will add the following.

If I say... "The dog and cat are playing a game" -- "The knife and fork are on the table" -- "My hat and gloves are in my pocket" -- "The TV and radio are in the den" -- "My car and bike are broken"... I certainly don't mean to make single units of each of those noun pairs.

Repeating the article or possessive, of course, is fine, and sometimes one might be changed, instead of repeated. to somewhat tweak the meaning -- for example, if we want to make it clear that one thing is definite {"the"} while the other is not {"a").

But if there's a rule that says that repeating the article/possessive is required, I've long ago forgotten it -- no doubt along with a lot of other native speakers. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samerickson89

Sorry, I didn't mean to make it sound like there was a specific, explicit rule pertaining to this exact situation. More of a logical rule that only applies in the objective case. Your example, "The TV and radio are in the den," would be fine since the number of the verb ("are" versus "is") removes any ambiguity. But if I were to say, "She fixed the TV and radio," that leaves uncertainty as to whether there are one or two objects.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yg_Yanka

The wiktionary pretends that the feminine accusative form for "ten" is "tou" and not "tu". I'm confused about that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

Are we looking at the same table? https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ten#Declension has "tou" clearly as instrumental, not accusative.

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